Treasure Island

Abraham Cowley

(1618 – 28 July 1667 / London)

Quotations

  • ''Nothing in Nature's sober found,
    But an eternal health goes round.
    Fill up the bowl, then, fill it high,
    Fill all the glasses there—for why
    Should every creature drink but I?
    Why, man of morals, tell me why?''
    Abraham Cowley (1618-1667), British poet. Drinking (l. 15-20). . . Seventeenth-Century Verse and Prose, Vols. I-II. Vol. I: 1600-1660; Vol. II: 1660-1700. Helen C. White, Ruth C. Wallerstein, and Ricardo Quintana, eds. (1951, 1952) The Macmillan Company.
    14 person liked.
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  • ''The thirsty earth soaks up the rain,
    And drinks, and gapes for drink again.
    The plants suck in the earth, and are
    With constant drinking fresh and fair.''
    Abraham Cowley (1618-1667), British essayist, poet. Drinking, Anacreon (1656).
  • ''The thirsty earth soaks up the rain,
    And drinks and gapes for drink again;''
    Abraham Cowley (1618-1667), British poet. Drinking (l. 1-2). . . Seventeenth-Century Verse and Prose, Vols. I-II. Vol. I: 1600-1660; Vol. II: 1660-1700. Helen C. White, Ruth C. Wallerstein, and Ricardo Quintana, eds. (1951, 1952) The Macmillan Company.
  • ''Even Lust the Master of a hardned Face,
    Blushes if thou beest in the place,
    To darkness' Curtains he retires,
    In Sympathizing Night he rowls his smoaky Fires.

    When, Goddess, thou liftst up thy wakened Head,
    Out of the Mornings purple bed,
    Thy Quire of Birds about thee play,
    And all the joyful world salutes the rising day.''
    Abraham Cowley (1618-1667), British poet. Hymn: To Light (l. 57-64). . . Seventeenth-Century Verse and Prose, Vols. I-II. Vol. I: 1600-1660; Vol. II: 1660-1700. Helen C. White, Ruth C. Wallerstein, and Ricardo Quintana, eds. (1951, 1952) The Macmillan Company.
  • '''Tis not such lines as almost crack the stage
    When Bajazet begins to rage;
    Nor a tall met'phor in the bombast way,
    Nor the dry chips of short-lunged Seneca.
    Nor upon all things to obtrude
    And force some odd similitude.
    What is it then, which like the power divine
    We only can by negatives define?''
    Abraham Cowley (1618-1667), British poet. Ode: Of Wit (l. 49-56). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''In a true piece of Wit all things must be,
    Yet all things there agree,
    As in the ark, joined without force or strife,
    All creatures dwelt: all creatures that had life;
    Or as the primitive forms of all
    (If we compare great things with small)
    Which without discord or confusion lie
    In that strange mirror of the Deity.''
    Abraham Cowley (1618-1667), British poet. Ode: Of Wit (l. 57-64). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Thy spotless Muse, like Mary, did contain
    The boundless Godhead; she did well disdain
    That her eternal Verse employ'd should be
    On a less subject than Eternitie;''
    Abraham Cowley (1618-1667), British poet. On the Death of Mr. Crashaw (l. 29-32). . . Seventeenth-Century Verse and Prose, Vols. I-II. Vol. I: 1600-1660; Vol. II: 1660-1700. Helen C. White, Ruth C. Wallerstein, and Ricardo Quintana, eds. (1951, 1952) The Macmillan Company.
  • ''Pardon, my Mother Church, if I consent
    That Angels led him when from thee he went,
    For even in Error sure no Danger is
    When joyn'd with so much Piety as His.''
    Abraham Cowley (1618-1667), British poet. On the Death of Mr. Crashaw (l. 47-50). . . Seventeenth-Century Verse and Prose, Vols. I-II. Vol. I: 1600-1660; Vol. II: 1660-1700. Helen C. White, Ruth C. Wallerstein, and Ricardo Quintana, eds. (1951, 1952) The Macmillan Company.
  • ''Ah wretched We, Poets of Earth! but Thou
    Wert Living the same Poet which thou'rt Now,
    Whilst Angels sing to thee their ayres divine,
    And joy in an applause so great as thine.
    Equal society with them to hold,
    Thou need'st not make new Songs, but say the Old.''
    Abraham Cowley (1618-1667), British poet. On the Death of Mr. Crashaw (l. 9-14). . . Seventeenth-Century Verse and Prose, Vols. I-II. Vol. I: 1600-1660; Vol. II: 1660-1700. Helen C. White, Ruth C. Wallerstein, and Ricardo Quintana, eds. (1951, 1952) The Macmillan Company.
  • ''We spent them not in toys, in lusts, or wine,
    But search of deep Philosophy,
    Wit, Eloquence, and Poetry,
    Arts which I loved, for they, my Friend, were thine.''
    Abraham Cowley (1618-1667), British poet. On the Death of Mr. William Hervey (l. 13-16). . . Seventeenth-Century Verse and Prose, Vols. I-II. Vol. I: 1600-1660; Vol. II: 1660-1700. Helen C. White, Ruth C. Wallerstein, and Ricardo Quintana, eds. (1951, 1952) The Macmillan Company.

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A Supplication

Awake, awake, my Lyre!
And tell thy silent master's humble tale
In sounds that may prevail;
Sounds that gentle thoughts inspire:
Though so exalted she
And I so lowly be
Tell her, such different notes make all thy harmony.

Hark, how the strings awake!

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