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Andrew Lang

(31 March 1844 - 20 July 1912 / Selkirk, Scotland)

Quotations

  • ''If the wild bowler thinks he bowls,
    Or if the batsman thinks he's bowled,
    They know not, poor misguided souls,
    They, too, shall perish unconsoled.''
    Andrew Lang (1844-1912), British poet. Brahma (l. 1-4). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
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  • ''bowler and the ball,
    The umpire, the pavilion cat,
    The roller, pitch, and stumps, and all.''
    Andrew Lang (1844-1912), British poet. Brahma (l. 6-8). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
  • ''He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp-posts—for support rather than illumination.''
    Andrew Lang (1844-1912), Scottish author. Quoted in The Harvest of a Quiet Eye, Alan L. Mackay (1977).
  • ''So gladly, from the songs of modern speech
    Men turn, and see the stars, and feel the free
    Shrill wind beyond the close of heavy flowers,
    And through the music of the languid hours,
    They hear like ocean on a western beach
    The surge and thunder of the Odyssey.''
    Andrew Lang (1844-1912), British poet. The Odyssey (l. 9-14). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.

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A Scot to Jeanne D’Arc

DARK Lily without blame,
Not upon us the shame,
Whose sires were to the Auld Alliance true;
They, by the Maiden’s side,
Victorious fought and died;
One stood by thee that fiery torment through,
Till the White Dove from thy pure lips had passed,
And thou wert with thine own St. Catherine at the last.

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