Anne Bradstreet

(1612 – 16 September 1672 / Northampton, England)

Quotations

  • ''The welcome house of him my dearest guest.
    Where ever, ever stay, and go not thence,
    Till natures sad decree shall call thee hence;
    Flesh of thy flesh, bone of thy bone,
    I here, thou there, yet both but one.''
    Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612-1672), Anglo-American poet. A Letter to Her Husband, Absent upon Public Employment (l. 22-26). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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  • ''A pilgrim I on earth perplext,
    with sinns, with cares and sorrows vext,
    By age and paines brought to decay,
    and my Clay house mouldring away,
    Oh how I long to be at rest
    and soare on high among the blest!''
    Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612-1672), Anglo-American poet. As Weary Pilgrim, Now at Rest (l. 19-24). . . Norton Anthology of American Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Nina Baym and others, eds. (2d ed., 1985) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''That when that knot's untied that made us one,
    I may seem thine, who in effect am none.
    And if I see not half my dayes that's due,
    What nature would, God grant to yours and you;''
    Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612-1672), Anglo-American poet. Before the Birth of One of Her Children (l. 11-14). . . Norton Anthology of American Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Nina Baym and others, eds. (2d ed., 1985) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''These o protect from step Dames injury.
    And if chance to thine eyes shall bring this verse,
    With some sad sighs honour my absent Herse;
    And kiss this paper for thy loves dear sake,
    Who with salt tears this last Farewel did take.''
    Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612-1672), Anglo-American poet. Before the Birth of One of Her Children (l. 24-28). . . Norton Anthology of American Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Nina Baym and others, eds. (2d ed., 1985) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''When I behold the heavens as in their prime,
    And then the earth (though old) still clad in green,
    The stones and trees, insensible of time,
    Nor age nor wrinkle on their front are seen;''
    Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612-1672), Anglo-American poet. Contemplations (l. 120-124). . . Poets of the English Language, Vols. I-V. Vol. I: Langland to Spenser; Vol. II: Marlowe to Marvell; Vol. III: Milton to Goldsmith; Vol. IV: Blake to Poe; Vol. V: Tennyson to Yeats. W. H. Auden and Norman Holmes Pearson, eds. (1950) The Viking Press.
  • ''Nor youth, nor strength, nor wisdom spring again,
    Nor habitations long their names retain,
    But in oblivion to the final day remain.''
    Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612-1672), Anglo-American poet. Contemplations (l. 131-133). . . Poets of the English Language, Vols. I-V. Vol. I: Langland to Spenser; Vol. II: Marlowe to Marvell; Vol. III: Milton to Goldsmith; Vol. IV: Blake to Poe; Vol. V: Tennyson to Yeats. W. H. Auden and Norman Holmes Pearson, eds. (1950) The Viking Press.
  • ''But he whose name is graved in the white stone
    Shall last and shine when all of these are gone.''
    Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612-1672), Anglo-American poet. Contemplations (l. 231-232). . . Poets of the English Language, Vols. I-V. Vol. I: Langland to Spenser; Vol. II: Marlowe to Marvell; Vol. III: Milton to Goldsmith; Vol. IV: Blake to Poe; Vol. V: Tennyson to Yeats. W. H. Auden and Norman Holmes Pearson, eds. (1950) The Viking Press.
  • ''O Time the fatal wrack of mortal things,
    That draws oblivion's curtains over kings;''
    Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612-1672), Anglo-American poet. Contemplations (l. 225-226). . . Poets of the English Language, Vols. I-V. Vol. I: Langland to Spenser; Vol. II: Marlowe to Marvell; Vol. III: Milton to Goldsmith; Vol. IV: Blake to Poe; Vol. V: Tennyson to Yeats. W. H. Auden and Norman Holmes Pearson, eds. (1950) The Viking Press.
  • ''But man grows old, lies down, remains where once he's laid.''
    Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612-1672), Anglo-American poet. Contemplations (l. 126). . . Poets of the English Language, Vols. I-V. Vol. I: Langland to Spenser; Vol. II: Marlowe to Marvell; Vol. III: Milton to Goldsmith; Vol. IV: Blake to Poe; Vol. V: Tennyson to Yeats. W. H. Auden and Norman Holmes Pearson, eds. (1950) The Viking Press.
  • ''And time brings down what is both strong and tall.
    But plants new set to be eradicate,
    And buds new blown, to have so short a date,
    Is by his hand alone that guides nature and fate.''
    Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612-1672), Anglo-American poet. In Memory of My Dear Grandchild Elizabeth Bradstreet Who Decesased August, 1665, Being a Year and a Half Old (l. 11-14). . . Norton Anthology of American Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Nina Baym and others, eds. (2d ed., 1985) W. W. Norton & Company.

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A Letter to Her Husband

Absent upon Public Employment

My head, my heart, mine eyes, my life, nay more,
My joy, my magazine, of earthly store,
If two be one, as surely thou and I,
How stayest thou there, whilst I at Ipswich lie?
So many steps, head from the heart to sever,
If but a neck, soon should we be together.
I, like the Earth this season, mourn in black,

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