Treasure Island

Carl Sandburg

(6 January 1878 – 22 July 1967 / Illinois)

Quotations

  • ''There will be a rusty gun on the wall, sweetheart,
    The rifle grooves curling with flakes of rust.
    A spider will make a silver string nest in the darkest, warmest
    corner of it.''
    Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), U.S. poet. A. E. F. (l. 1-3). . . Modern American & British Poetry. Louis Untermeyer, ed., in consultation with Karl Shapiro and Richard Wilbur. (Rev., shorter ed., 1955) Harcourt, Brace and Company.
    264 person liked.
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  • ''The buffaloes are gone.
    And those who saw the buffaloes are gone.''
    Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), U.S. poet. Buffalo Dusk (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse in America, The. Donald Hall, ed. (1985) Oxford University Press.
  • ''And they tell me you are brutal and my reply is: On the faces of
    women and children I have seen the marks of wanton hunger.
    And having answered so I turn once more to those who sneer at this
    my city, and I give them back the sneer and say to them:
    Come and show me another city with lifted head singing so proud to
    be alive and coarse and strong and cunning.''
    Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), U.S. poet. Chicago (l. 10-12). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Hog Butcher for the World,
    Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat,
    Player with Railroads and the Nation's Freight Handler;
    Stormy, husky, brawling,
    City of the Big Shoulders.''
    Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), U.S. poet. "Chicago," Chicago Poems (1916).
  • ''tell me if the lovers are losers . . . tell me if any get more
    than the lovers . . . in the dust . . . in the cool tombs.''
    Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), U.S. poet. Cool Tombs (l. 4). . . Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.
  • ''Pocahontas' body, lovely as a poplar, sweet as a red haw in
    November''
    Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), U.S. poet. Cool Tombs (l. 3). . . Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.
  • ''The woman named Tomorrow
    sits with a hairpin in her teeth
    and takes her time''
    Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), U.S. poet. Four Preludes on Playthings of the Wind (l. 1-3). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
  • ''and the girls chanted:
    We are the greatest city,
    and the greatest nation:
    nothing like us ever was.''
    Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), U.S. poet. Four Preludes on Playthings of the Wind (l. 13-16). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
  • ''The feet of the rats
    scribble on the doorsills;
    the hieroglyphs of the rat footprints
    chatter the pedigrees of the rats''
    Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), U.S. poet. Four Preludes on Playthings of the Wind (l. 50-53). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Pile the bodies high at Austerlitz and Waterloo.
    Shovel them under and let me work—
    I am the grass; I cover all.''
    Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), U.S. poet. Grass (l. 1-3). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.

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Silver Nails

A man was crucified. He came to the city a stranger,
was accused, and nailed to a cross. He lingered hanging.
Laughed at the crowd. "The nails are iron," he
said, "You are cheap. In my country when we crucify
we use silver nails. . ." So he went jeering. They
did not understand him at first. Later they talked about
him in changed voices in the saloons, bowling alleys, and
churches. It came over them every man is crucified
only once in his life and the law of humanity dictates

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