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(7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870 / Landport, Portsea)

Quotations

  • ''A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.''
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. A Tale of Two Cities, bk. 1, ch. 3 (1859).
    71 person liked.
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  • ''Dignity, and even holiness too, sometimes, are more questions of coat and waistcoat than some people imagine.''
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Oliver Twist, ch. 37, p. 267 (1838).
  • ''Along the Paris streets, the death-carts rumble, hollow and harsh. Six tumbrils carry the day's wine to La Guillotine.''
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. A Tale of Two Cities, Part 3, ch. 15 (1859).
  • ''Three meals of thin gruel a day, with an onion twice a week, and half a roll on Saturdays.''
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Oliver Twist, ch. 2, p. 11 (1838).
  • ''It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way—in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.''
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. A Tale of Two Cities, bk. 1, ch. 1 (1859). Opening lines.
  • ''Three meals of thin gruel a day, with an onion twice a week, and half a roll on Saturdays.''
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Oliver Twist, ch. 2, p. 11 (1838).
  • ''It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way—in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.''
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. A Tale of Two Cities, ch. 1, p. 1, "The Period," (1859). The famous opening sentence of A Tale of Two Cities, of which only the first phrase is usually cited.
  • ''There is a passion for hunting something deeply implanted in the human breast.''
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Oliver Twist, ch. 10 (1838). Referring to chasing pickpockets.
  • ''It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.''
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. A Tale of Two Cities, bk. 3, ch. 15 (1859). Sydney Carton's thoughts on the scaffold, the closing words of the book.
  • ''Dignity, and even holiness too, sometimes, are more questions of coat and waistcoat than some people imagine.''
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Oliver Twist, ch. 37, p. 267 (1838).

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Little Nell's Funeral

And now the bell, - the bell
She had so often heard by night and day
And listened to with solemn pleasure,
E'en as a living voice, -
Rung its remorseless toll for her,
So young, so beautiful, so good.

Decrepit age, and vigorous life,
And blooming youth, and helpless infancy,

[Hata Bildir]