Charles Stuart Calverley

(22 December 1831 – 17 February 1884 / Martley, Worchestershire)

Quotations

  • '''Tis not that thy mien is stately,
    'Tis not that thy tones are soft;''
    Charles Stuart Calverley (1831-1884), British poet. Lines on Hearing the Organ (l. 93-94). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
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  • ''Grinder, who serenely grindest
    At my door the Hundredth Psalm,''
    Charles Stuart Calverley (1831-1884), British poet. Lines on Hearing the Organ (l. 1-2). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Tell me, Grinder, if thou grindest
    Always, always out of tune.''
    Charles Stuart Calverley (1831-1884), British poet. Lines on Hearing the Organ (l. 19-20). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
  • ''But I've heard mankind abuse thee;
    And perhaps it's rather strange,
    But I thought that I would choose thee
    For encomium, as a change.''
    Charles Stuart Calverley (1831-1884), British poet. Lines on Hearing the Organ (l. 97-100). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Go mad, and beat their wives;
    Plunge (after shocking lives)
    Razors and carving knives
    Into their gizzards.''
    Charles Stuart Calverley (1831-1884), British poet. "Ode to Tobacco." This is possibly a reference to a letter in the medical journal Lancet, Feb. 14, 1857: "[Dr. Webster] distinctly enumerates tobacco as one of the causes of insanity.... Two brothers in one family had become deranged from smoking tobacco, and in that state had committed suicide."
  • ''Her sheep follow'd her, as their tails did them.
    (Butter and eggs and a pound of cheese)
    And this song is consider'd a perfect gem,
    And as to the meaning, it's what you please.''
    Charles Stuart Calverley (1831-1884), British poet. The auld wife sat at her ivied door (l. 37-40). . . Norton Book of Light Verse, The. Russell Baker, ed. (1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''The farmer's daughter hath soft brown hair;
    (Butter and eggs and a pound of cheese)
    And I met with a ballad, I can't say where,
    Which wholly consisted of lines like these.''
    Charles Stuart Calverley (1831-1884), British poet. The auld wife sat at her ivied door (l. 21-24). ElL. Norton Book of Light Verse, The. Russell Baker, ed. (1986) W. W. Norton & Company.

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Forever

"Forever": 'tis a single word!
Our rude forefathers deemed it two:
Can you imagine so absurd
A view?

"Forever"! What abysms of woe
The word reveals, what frenzy, what
Despair! "For ever" (printed so)
Did not.

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