Treasure Island

Christopher Pearse Cranch

(1815-1892 / the USA)

Biography of Christopher Pearse Cranch

Christopher Pearse Cranch poet

Christopher Pearse Cranch (March 8, 1815 – January 20, 1892) was an American writer and artist.

Cranch was born in the District of Columbia. He attended Columbian College and Harvard Divinity School. He briefly held a position as a Unitarian minister. Later, he pursued various occupations: a magazine editor, caricaturist, children's fantasy writer (the Huggermugger books), poet (The Bird and the Bell with Other Poems in 1875), translator, and landscape painter. He lived most of his life in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Though not one of its founding members, Cranch became associated with the Transcendental Club; his connection with the Transcendentalists ultimately diminished his demand as a minister. Cranch's caricatures of Ralph Waldo Emerson were later collected as Illustrations of the New Philosophy: Guide. His poetry was published in The Harbinger and The Dial among other publications.

As a painter, Cranch painted landscapes along the lines of Thomas Cole, the Hudson River school, and the Barbizon school in France. In one foray into historical painting, Cranch depicted the burning of P. T. Barnum's American Museum in New York City. Later in life, Cranch painted scenes from Venice and Italy.

Christopher Pearse Cranch's Works:

* Poems (1844)
* The Last of the Huggermuggers, A Giant Story (1855)
* Kobboltozo (1857)
* The Aeneid of Virgil (translation, 1872}
* The Bird and the Bell with Other Poems (1875)
* Ariel and Caliban with Other Poems (1886)

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PoemHunter.com Updates

A Question

AH, who can tell which guide were best
To truth long sought, but unattained —
The early faith, or late unrest?
What age has earned, or boyhood gained?
When down life's vista as we gaze,
Where vanished youth's remembered gleam,
The radiance of the unconscious days —
The dream that knew not 't was a dream —
The time ere yet the shades of doubt

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