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Deborah Ager

(1971)

Biography of Deborah Ager

Deborah Ager poet

Deborah Ager is an American poet.

Life

Ager founded the poetry magazine known as 32 poems or 32 Poems Magazine in 2003 with the poet John Poch. She was educated at the University of Maryland (B.A.) and the University of Florida (M.F.A.).

Her writing has appeared in New England Review, The Georgia Review, Birmingham Poetry Review, Los Angeles Review, Barn Owl, North American Review, and Best New Poets 2006. She has received fellowships and/or scholarships from the MacDowell Colony, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, the Atlantic Center for the Arts, the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation. She was a Walter E. Dakin fellow at the Sewanee Writers' Conference as well as a Tennessee Williams Scholar.

Her manuscript, Midnight Voices, was a semifinalist for the A. Poulin, Jr. Poetry Prize in 2007 before being accepted for publication by Cherry Grove Collections.

In 2011, she edited the poetry anthology Poetry Doesn't Need You with the poet John Poch and scholar Bill Beverly. The book is forthcoming in 2012.

Deborah Ager's Works:

From the Fishouse, May 2011
"The Problem With Describing Men"
"Mangos", Delaware Poetry Review, March 2003
"Alone"; "Dear Deborah"; "Morning", La Petite zine, 2002
"The Lake", Connecticut Review, 2002
"Night in Iowa", Georgia Review, 2000
"Night: San Francisco", New England Review, 2002
"Santa Fe In Winter", New England Review, 2002
"The Space Coast", American Literary Review, 2002
"The Tortoise In Keystone Heights" American Literary Review, 2002
Poetry Doesn't Like You: The First 10 Years of 32 Poems Magazine. WordFarm Press. 2012. 1st edition WordFarm Press, edited with John Poch and Bill Beverly
Midnight Voices. Wordtech Communications. 2009. 1st edition Cherry Grove Collections

PoemHunter.com Updates

Dear Deborah,

They tell me that your heart
has been found in Iowa,
pumping along Interstate 35.
Do you want it back?

When the cold comes on
this fast, it's Iowa again--
where pollen disperses
evenly on the dented Fords,

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