Dorothy Parker

(22 August 1893 - 7 June 1967 / Long Branch / New Jersey)

Quotations

  • ''Hollywood money isn't money. It's congealed snow, melts in your hand, and there you are.''
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. Interview in Writers at Work, First Series, ed. Malcolm Cowley (1958).
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  • ''Gratitude—the meanest and most snivelling attribute in the world.''
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. Interview in Writers at Work, First Series, ed. Malcolm Cowley (1958).
  • ''As artists they're rot, but as providers they're oil wells; they gush. Norris said she never wrote a story unless it was fun to do. I understand Ferber whistles at her typewriter. And there was that poor sucker Flaubert rolling around on his floor for three days looking for the right word.''
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. Interview in Writers at Work, First Series, ed. Malcolm Cowley (1958).
  • ''All those writers who write about their childhood! Gentle God, if I wrote about mine you wouldn't sit in the same room with me.''
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. Interview in Writers at Work, First Series, ed. Malcolm Cowley (1958).
  • ''I can't talk about Hollywood. It was a horror to me when I was there and it's a horror to look back on. I can't imagine how I did it. When I got away from it I couldn't even refer to the place by name. "Out there," I called it.''
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. Interview in Writers at Work, First Series, ed. Malcolm Cowley (1958).
  • ''Those who have mastered etiquette, who are entirely, impeccably right, would seem to arrive at a point of exquisite dullness.''
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. repr. in The Portable Dorothy Parker, pt. 2 (1944, revised 1973). "Mrs. Post Enlarges on Etiquette," The New Yorker (December 31, 1927).
  • ''Men seldom make passes
    At girls who wear glasses.''
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. News Item, Enough Rope (1926).
  • ''He has a capacity for enjoyment so vast that he gives away great chunks to those about him, and never even misses them.... He can take you to a bicycle race and make it raise your hair.''
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. New Yorker (November 30, 1929).
  • ''Tonstant Weader fwowed up.''
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. New Yorker (Oct. 20, 1928), repr. in The Collected Dorothy Parker, pt. 2 (1973). Closing words of review of The House at Pooh Corner, in Parker's "Constant Reader" column.
  • ''Why is it no one ever sent me yet
    One perfect limousine, do you suppose?
    Ah no, it's always just my luck to get
    One perfect rose.''
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. One Perfect Rose, st. 3, Enough Rope (1926).

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Recurrence

We shall have our little day.
Take my hand and travel still
Round and round the little way,
Up and down the little hill.

It is good to love again;
Scan the renovated skies,
Dip and drive the idling pen,
Sweetly tint the paling lies.

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