Treasure Island

Ellen Glasgow

(1873-1945 / USA)

Quotations

  • ''Surely one of the peculiar habits of circumstances is the way they follow, in their eternal recurrence, a single course. If an event happens once in a life, it may be depended upon to repeat later its general design.''
    Ellen Glasgow (1873-1945), U.S. novelist. The Woman Within, ch. 11 (1954). Written in 1944.
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  • ''...I had grown up in a world that was dominated by immature age. Not by vigorous immaturity, but by immaturity that was old and tired and prudent, that loved ritual and rubric, and was utterly wanting in curiosity about the new and the strange. Its era has passed away, and the world it made has crumbled around us. Its finest creation, a code of manners, has been ridiculed and discarded.''
    Ellen Glasgow (1873-1945), U.S. novelist. The Woman Within, ch. 12 (1954). Written in 1944, on growing up in Richmond, Virginia.
  • ''I waited and worked, and watched the inferior exalted for nearly thirty years; and when recognition came at last, it was too late to alter events, or to make a difference in living.''
    Ellen Glasgow (1873-1945), U.S. novelist. The Woman Within, ch. 13 (1954). Written in 1944. The important American Southern "regional" novelist was remembering her long wait for critical recognition.
  • ''A tragic irony of life is that we so often achieve success or financial independence after the chief reason for which we sought it has passed away.''
    Ellen Glasgow (1873-1945), U.S. novelist. The Woman Within, ch. 16 (1954). Written in 1944. Glasgow, who became a widely recognized novelist only after decades of writing, was reflecting on the fact that her mother, whom she would have liked to aid financially, died before her first book was published.
  • ''What I hated even more than the conflict was the lurid spectacle of a world of unreason.''
    Ellen Glasgow (1873-1945), U.S. novelist. The Woman Within, ch. 19 (1954). Written in 1944, near the end of World War II.
  • ''The world of the egotist is, inevitably, a narrow world, and the boundaries of self are limited to the close horizon of personality.... But, within this horizon, there is room for many attributes that are excellent....''
    Ellen Glasgow (1873-1945), U.S. novelist. The Woman Within, ch. 19 (1954). Written in 1944.
  • ''When this immediate evil power has been defeated, we shall not yet have won the long battle with the elemental barbarities. Another Hitler, it may be an invisible adversary, will attempt, again, and yet again, to destroy our frail civilization. Is it true, I wonder, that the only way to escape a war is to be in it? When one is a part of an actuality does the imagination find a release?''
    Ellen Glasgow (1873-1945), U.S. novelist. The Woman Within, ch. 22 (1954). Written in 1944, near the end of World War II.
  • ''My first reading of Tolstoy affected me as a revelation from heaven, as the trumpet of the judgment. What he made me feel was not the desire to imitate, but the conviction that imitation was futile.''
    Ellen Glasgow (1873-1945), U.S. novelist. The Woman Within, ch. 10 (1954). Written in 1944. Tolstoy (1828-1910), author of War and Peace (1866), was a major nineteenth-century Russian novelist.
  • ''Moderation has never yet engineered an explosion ....''
    Ellen Glasgow (1873-1945), U.S. novelist. The Woman Within, ch. 21 (1954). Written in 1937.
  • ''...America has enjoyed the doubtful blessing of a single-track mind. We are able to accommodate, at a time, only one national hero; and we demand that that hero shall be uniform and invincible. As a literate people we are preoccupied, neither with the race nor the individual, but with the type. Yesterday, we romanticized the "tough guy;" today, we are romanticizing the underprivileged, tough or tender; tomorrow, we shall begin to romanticize the pure primitive.''
    Ellen Glasgow (1873-1945), U.S. novelist. The Woman Within, ch. 21 (1954). Written in 1937.

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The Freeman

'Hope is a slave; Despair is a freeman.'


A VAGABOND between the East and West,
Careless I greet the scourging and the rod;
I fear no terror any man may bring,
Nor any god.

The clankless chains that bound me I have rent,

[Hata Bildir]