Treasure Island

Frank Moore Colby


Quotations

  • ''Politics is a place of humble hopes and strangely modest requirements, where all are good who are not criminal and all are wise who are not ridiculously otherwise.''
    Frank Moore Colby (1865-1925), U.S. editor, essayist. "On Seeing Ten Bad Plays," vol. 1, The Colby Essays (1926).
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  • ''If a large city can, after intense intellectual efforts, choose for its mayor a man who merely will not steal from it, we consider it a triumph of the suffrage.''
    Frank Moore Colby (1865-1925), U.S. editor, essayist. "On Seeing Ten Bad Plays," vol. 1, The Colby Essays (1926).
  • ''One learns little more about a man from the feats of his literary memory than from the feats of his alimentary canal.''
    Frank Moore Colby (1865-1925), U.S. editor, essayist. "Quotation and Allusion," vol. 1, The Colby Essays (1926).
  • ''Men will confess to treason, murder, arson, false teeth, or a wig. How many of them will own up to a lack of humor?''
    Frank Moore Colby (1865-1925), U.S. editor, essayist. "Satire and Teeth," vol. 1, The Colby Essays (1926).
  • ''Clever people seem not to feel the natural pleasure of bewilderment, and are always answering questions when the chief relish of a life is to go on asking them.''
    Frank Moore Colby (1865-1925), U.S. editor, essayist. "Simple Simon," vol. 1, The Colby Essays (1926).
  • ''That is the consolation of a little mind; you have the fun of changing it without impeding the progress of mankind.''
    Frank Moore Colby (1865-1925), U.S. editor, essayist. "Simple Simon," vol. 1, The Colby Essays (1926).
  • ''Minds do not act together in public; they simply stick together; and when their private activities are resumed, they fly apart again.''
    Frank Moore Colby (1865-1925), U.S. editor, essayist. "Simple Simon," vol. 1, The Colby Essays (1926).
  • ''By rights, satire is a lonely and introspective occupation, for nobody can describe a fool to the life without much patient self-inspection.''
    Frank Moore Colby (1865-1925), U.S. editor, essayist. "Simple Simon," vol. 1, The Colby Essays (1926).
  • ''Talk ought always to run obliquely, not nose to nose with no chance of mental escape.''
    Frank Moore Colby (1865-1925), U.S. editor, essayist. "Simple Simon," vol. 1, The Colby Essays (1926).
  • ''We always carry out by committee anything in which any one of us alone would be too reasonable to persist.''
    Frank Moore Colby (1865-1925), U.S. editor, essayist. "Subsidizing Authors," vol. 1, The Colby Essays (1926).

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