Post more comments
Want a gift card for being active Forum member? Post comments and win $25 gift card every week.
Rules:
PoemHunter.com will be giving away Amazon.com gift cards (worth $75 in total) every week to first three members ($25 each) who participate most in our forum discussions. You just have to post comments on forum pages, poet pages or poem pages anywhere inside PoemHunter.com
Comments posted needs to be in different pages. Posting more than 1 comment on the same page will only be counted once.
Members can not post comments without being logged in.
PoemHunter.com has the right to cancel or edit this contest.
PoemHunter.com has a right to disqualify or ban member(s) without providing any type of reason, belief or proof in regards to any type of illegal activity or fraud.

Henry Timrod

(8 December 1828 - 7 October 1867 / Charleston, South Carolina)

Quotations

  • ''Shall the Spring dawn, and she still clad in smiles,
    And with an unscathed brow,
    Rest in the strong arms of her palm-crowned isles,
    As fair and free as now?

    We know not; in the temple of the Fates
    God has inscribed her doom;
    And, all untroubled in her faith, she waits
    The triumph or the tomb.''
    Henry Timrod (1828-1867), U.S. poet. Charleston (l. 37-44). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
    3 person liked.
    4 person did not like.
  • ''Calm as that second summer which precedes
    The first fall of the snow,
    In the broad sunlight of heroic deeds,
    The City bides the foe.''
    Henry Timrod (1828-1867), U.S. poet. Charleston (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
  • ''What if, both mad and blinded in their rage,
    Our foes should fling us down their mortal gage,
    And with a hostile step profane our sod!
    We shall not shrink, my brothers, but go forth''
    Henry Timrod (1828-1867), U.S. poet. Ethnogenesis (l. 36-39). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Sleep sweetly in your humble graves,
    Sleep, martyrs of a fallen cause;
    Though yet no marble column craves
    The pilgrim here to pause.''
    Henry Timrod (1828-1867), U.S. poet. Sleep sweetly in your humble graves (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Stoop, angels, hither from the skies!
    There is no holier spot of ground
    Than where defeated valor lies,
    By mourning beauty crowned!''
    Henry Timrod (1828-1867), U.S. poet. Sleep sweetly in your humble graves (l. 17-20). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Hath not the morning dawned with added light?
    And shall not evening call another star
    Out of the infinite regions of the night,
    To mark this day in Heaven? At last, we are
    A nation among nations; and the world
    Shall soon behold in many a distant port
    Another flag unfurled!''
    Henry Timrod (1828-1867), U.S. poet. Ethnogenesis (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
  • ''To doubt the end were want of trust in God,
    Who, if he has decreed
    That we must pass a redder sea
    Than that which rang to Miriam's holy glee,
    Will surely raise at need
    A Moses with his rod!''
    Henry Timrod (1828-1867), U.S. poet. Ethnogenesis (l. 81-86). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.

Read more quotations »

Sonnet 13

I thank you, kind and best belov"ed friend,
With the same thanks one murmurs to a sister,
When, for some gentle favor, he hath kissed her,
Less for the gifts than for the love you send,
Less for the flowers than what the flowers convey,
If I, indeed, divine their meaning truly,
And not unto myself ascribe, unduly,
Things which you neither meant nor wished to say,

[Hata Bildir]