Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

(27 February 1807 – 24 March 1882 / Portland, Maine)

Quotations

  • ''My own thoughts
    Are my companions; my designs and labors
    And aspirations are my only friends.''
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882), U.S. poet. "The Masque of Pandora."
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  • ''Thy fate is the common fate of all;
    Into each life some rain must fall.''
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882), U.S. poet. The Rainy Day, st. 3, Ballads and Other Poems (1842).
  • ''There was a little girl
    Who had a little curl
    Right in the middle of her forehead,
    When she was good
    She was very, very good,
    But when she was bad she was horrid.''
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1822), U.S. poet. There Was A little Girl, E.W. Longfellow, Random Memories (1922). Composed for his infant daughter, c. 1850.
  • ''There the wrinkled old Nokomis
    Nursed the little Hiawatha,
    Rocked him in his linden cradle,
    Bedded softin moss and rushes,''
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Song of Hiawatha (l. 67-70). . . Family Book of Verse, The. Lewis Gannett, ed. (1961) Harper & Row.
  • ''By the shores of Gitche Gumee,
    By the shining Big-Sea-Water,
    Stood the wigwam of Nokomis,
    Daughter of the Moon, Nokomis.''
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Song of Hiawatha (l. 57-60). . . Family Book of Verse, The. Lewis Gannett, ed. (1961) Harper & Row.
  • ''Then the little Hiawatha
    Learned of every bird its language,
    Learned their names and all their secrets,''
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Song of Hiawatha (l. 125-128). . . Family Book of Verse, The. Lewis Gannett, ed. (1961) Harper & Row.
  • ''The morning breaks; the steeds in their stalls
    Stamp and neigh, as the hostler calls;
    The day returns, but nevermore
    Returns the traveler to the shore,
    And the tide rises, the tide falls.''
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Tide Rises, the Tide Falls (l. 11-15). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
  • ''The tide rises, the tide falls,
    The twilight darkens, the curlew calls;
    Along the sea-sands damp and brown
    The traveler hastens toward the town,
    And the tide rises, the tide falls.''
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Tide Rises, the Tide Falls (l. 1-5). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Toiling,—rejoicing,—sorrowing,
    Onward through life he goes;
    Each morning sees some task begin,
    Each evening sees its close;
    Something attempted, something done,
    Has earned a night's repose.''
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Village Blacksmith (l. 37-42). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Thanks, thanks to thee, my worthy friend,
    For the lesson thou hast taught!
    Thus at the flaming forge of life
    Our fortunes must be wrought;
    Thus on its sounding anvil shaped
    Each burning deed and thought!''
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809-1882), U.S. poet. The Village Blacksmith (l. 43-48). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.

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Village Blacksmith, The

Under a spreading chestnut tree
The village smithy stands;
The Smith, a mighty man is he,
With large and sinewy hands;
And the muscles of his brawny arms
Are strong as iron bands.

His hair is crisp, and black, and long,
His face is like the tan;

[Hata Bildir]