Treasure Island

James Madison


Quotations

  • ''Perhaps it is a universal truth that the loss of liberty at home is to be charged to provisions against danger, real or pretended, from abroad.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to Jefferson, May 13, 1798. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 17, p. 130, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
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  • ''It is to the press mankind are indebted for having dispelled the clouds which so long encompassed religion, for disclosing her genuine lustre, and disseminating her salutary doctrines.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Virginia Report of 1800 (January 7, 1800). W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 17, p. 347, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''[Restraints on the press] in all ages, have debauched morals, depressed liberty, shackled religion, supported despotism, and deluged the scaffold with blood.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Virginia Report of 1800 (January 7, 1800). W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 17, p. 347, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''All that seems indispensible in stating the account between the dead and the living, is to see that the debts against the latter do not exceed the advances made by the former.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to Thomas Jefferson, February 4, 1790. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 13, p. 23, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''[Urging the national government] to eradicate local prejudices and mistaken rivalships to consolidate the affairs of the states into one harmonious interest.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. "Consolidation" (December 3, 1791). W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 14, p. 139, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''The circulation of confidence is better than the circulation of money.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Speech at Virginia Convention, June 20, 1788. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 11, p. 164, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''If we are to take for the criterion of truth the majority of suffrages, they ought to be gotten from those philosophic and patriotic citizens who cultivate their reason.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to Benjamin Rush, March 7, 1790. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 13, pp. 93-94, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''As yet her conduct has been great both as a free and as a martial nation. We hope it will continue so, and finally baffle all her enemies, who are in fact the enemies of human nature.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to George Nicholas, March 15, 1793. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 14, p. 472, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991). On the French Revolution.
  • ''The class of citizens who provide at once their own food and their own raiment, may be viewed as the most truly independent and happy.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. "Republican Distribution of Citizens" (March 3, 1792). W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 14, p. 246, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''[Montesquieu] lifted the veil from the venerable errors which enslaved opinion, and pointed the way to those luminous truths of which he had but a glimpse himself.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. "Spirit of Governments" (February 20, 1792). W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 14, p. 233, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).

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