Treasure Island

James Russell Lowell

(22 February 1819 – 12 August 1891 / Cambridge, Massachusetts)

Quotations

  • ''The snow had begun in the gloaming,
    And busily all the night
    Had been heaping field and highway
    With a silence deep and white.''
    James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), U.S. poet. The First Snowfall (l. 1-4). . . Anthology of American Poetry. George Gesner, ed. (1983) Avenel Books.
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  • ''Then, with eyes that saw not, I kissed her;
    And she, kissing back, could not know
    That my kiss was given to her sister,
    Folded close under deepening snow.''
    James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), U.S. poet. The First Snowfall (l. 37-40). . . Anthology of American Poetry. George Gesner, ed. (1983) Avenel Books.
  • ''Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne.''
    James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), U.S. poet, editor. repr. In Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell (1978). The Present Crisis, st. 8 (1844).
  • ''Who knows whither the clouds have fled?
    In the unscarred heaven they leave no wake,
    And the eyes forget the tears they have shed,
    The heart forgets its sorrow and ache;
    The soul partakes the season's youth,
    And the sulphurous rifts of passion and woe
    Lie deep 'neath a silence pure and smooth,
    Like burnt-out craters healed with snow.''
    James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), U.S. poet. The Vision of Sir Launfal (l. 73-81). . . Family Book of Best Loved Poems, The. David L. George, ed. (1952) Doubleday & Company.
  • ''And what is so rare as a day in June?
    Then, if ever, come perfect days;
    Then Heaven tries earth if it be in tune,
    And over it softly her warm ear lays:
    Whether we look, or whether we listen,
    We hear life murmur, or see it glisten;''
    James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), U.S. poet. The Vision of Sir Launfal (l. 73-81). . . Family Book of Best Loved Poems, The. David L. George, ed. (1952) Doubleday & Company.
  • ''Joy comes, grief goes, we know not how;
    Everything is happy now,
    Everything is upward striving;''
    James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), U.S. poet. The Vision of Sir Launfal (l. 73-81). . . Family Book of Best Loved Poems, The. David L. George, ed. (1952) Doubleday & Company.
  • ''Dear common flower, that grow'st beside the way,
    Fringing the dusty road with harmless gold,
    First pledge of blithesome May,
    Which children pluck, and, full of pride, uphold,
    Hight-hearted buccaneers, o'erjoyed that they
    An Eldorado in the grass have found,
    Which not the rich earth's ample round
    May match in wealth—thou art more dear to me
    Than all the prouder summer-blooms may be.''
    James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), U.S. poet. To the Dandelion (l. 1-9). . . Anthology of American Poetry. George Gesner, ed. (1983) Avenel Books.
  • ''How like a prodigal doth nature seem,
    When thou, for all thy gold, so common art!
    Thou teachest me to deem
    More sacredly of every human heart,
    Since each reflects in joy its scanty gleam
    Of Heaven, and could some wondrous secret show,
    Did we but pay the love we owe,
    And with a child's undoubting wisdom look
    On all these living pages of God's book.''
    James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), U.S. poet. To the Dandelion (l. 73-81). . . Anthology of American Poetry. George Gesner, ed. (1983) Avenel Books.
  • ''As one lamp lights another, nor grows less,
    So nobleness enkindleth nobleness.''
    James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), U.S. poet. Yussouf (l. 17-18). . . Family Book of Best Loved Poems, The. David L. George, ed. (1952) Doubleday & Company.
  • ''First-born, for whom by day and night I yearn,
    Balanced and just are all of God's decrees;
    Thou art avenged, my first-born, sleep in peace!"''
    James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), U.S. poet. Yussouf (l. 28-30). . . Family Book of Best Loved Poems, The. David L. George, ed. (1952) Doubleday & Company.

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The Search

I went to seek for Christ,
And Nature seemed so fair
That first the woods and fields my youth enticed,
And I was sure to find him there:
The temple I forsook,
And to the solitude
Allegiance paid; but Winter came and shook
The crown and purple from my wood;
His snows, like desert sands, with scornful drift,

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