John Ruskin

(1819-1900 / England)

John Ruskin Quotes

  • ''Of all the things that oppress me, this sense of the evil working of nature herself—my disgust at her barbarity—clumsiness—darkness—bitter mockery of herself—is the most desolating.''
    John Ruskin (1819-F1900), British art critic, author. Letter, April 3, 1871. quoted in Ruskin Today, sct. 115, ed. Kenneth Clark (1964).
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  • ''Men are more evanescent than pictures, yet one sorrows for lost friends, and pictures are my friends. I have none others. I am never long enough with men to attach myself to them; and whatever feelings of attachment I have are to material things.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. letter, Jan. 28, 1852, to his father. quoted in Ruskin Today, sct. 36, ed. Kenneth Clark (1964).
  • ''Life being very short, and the quiet hours of it few, we ought to waste none of them in reading valueless books.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Sesame and Lilies, preface (1865).
  • ''How long most people would look at the best book before they would give the price of a large turbot for it?''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. repr. in The Works of John Ruskin, vol. 18, eds. E.T. Cook and Alexander Weddesburn (1905). Sesame and Lilies, lecture 1, sct. 32 (1865).
  • ''You might sooner get lightning out of incense smoke than true action or passion out of your modern English religion.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Sesame and Lilies, lecture 1 (1865).
  • ''All books are divisible into two classes: the books of the hour, and the books of all time.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Sesame and Lilies, lecture 1 (1865).
  • ''Nearly all the evils in the Church have arisen from bishops desiring power more than light. They want authority, not outlook.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Sesame and Lilies, lecture 1, sct. 22, repr. in The Works of John Ruskin, vol. 18, eds. E.T. Cook and Alexander Weddesburn (1905).
  • ''Be sure that you go to the author to get at his meaning, not to find yours.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. repr. in The Works of John Ruskin, vol. 18, eds. E.T. Cook and Alexander Weddesburn (1905). Sesame and Lilies, lecture 1, sct. 13, no. 2 (1865).
  • ''You may chisel a boy into shape, as you would a rock, or hammer him into it, if he be of a better kind, as you would a piece of bronze. But you cannot hammer a girl into anything. She grows as a flower does.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. repr. in The Works of John Ruskin, vol. 18, eds. E.T. Cook and Alexander Weddesburn (1905). Sesame and Lilies, lecture 2, sct. 78 (1865).
  • ''When we build, let us think that we build for ever.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Seven Lamps of Architecture, "The Lamp of Memory," sct. 10 (1849).

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Best Poem of John Ruskin

Trust Thou Thy Love

TRUST thou thy Love: if she be proud, is she not sweet?
Trust thou thy Love: if she be mute, is she not pure?
Lay thou thy soul full in her hands, low at her feet;
Fail, Sun and Breath!--yet, for thy peace, She shall endure.

Read the full of Trust Thou Thy Love

Trust Thou Thy Love

TRUST thou thy Love: if she be proud, is she not sweet?
Trust thou thy Love: if she be mute, is she not pure?
Lay thou thy soul full in her hands, low at her feet;
Fail, Sun and Breath!--yet, for thy peace, She shall endure.

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