Jonathan Swift

(30 November 1667 – 19 October 1745 / Dublin)

Quotations

  • ''I cannot but conclude the bulk of your natives to be the most pernicious race of little, odious vermin that Nature ever suffered to crawl upon the surface of the earth.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. The king of Brobdingnag to Gulliver, in "A Voyage to Brobdingnag," ch. 6, Gulliver's Travels (1726).
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  • ''Where I am not understood, it shall be concluded that something very useful and profound is couched underneath.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. The Tale of a Tub, preface (1704).
  • ''The most positive men are the most credulous.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. Thoughts on Various Subjects (1711).
  • ''Ambition often puts Men upon doing the meanest offices; so climbing is performed in the same position with creeping.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. Thoughts on Various Subjects (1711).
  • ''We have just enough religion to make us hate, but not enough to make us love one another.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. repr. in Jonathan Swift: A Critical Edition of the Major Works, eds. Angus Ross and David Woolley (1984). "Various Thoughts Moral and Diverting," Miscellanies in Prose and Verse (1711).
  • ''Censure is the tax a man pays to the public for being eminent.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. repr. in Jonathan Swift: A Critical Edition of the Major Works, eds. Angus Ross and David Woolley (1984). "Various Thoughts Moral and Diverting," Miscellanies in Prose and Verse (1711).
  • ''Poor nations are hungry, and rich nations are proud; and pride and hunger will ever be at variance.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. "A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnhnms," pt. 4, ch. 5, Gulliver's Travels (1726).
  • ''Once kick the world, and the world and you will live together at a reasonably good understanding.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. Letter of Advice to a Young Poet (Dec. 1, 1720).
  • ''A footman may swear; but he cannot swear like a lord. He can swear as often: but can he swear with equal delicacy, propriety, and judgment?''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. Polite Conversation, introduction (1738).
  • ''May you live all the days of your life.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. repr. In The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, vol. 4, ed. Herbert Davis (1957). The Colonel, in Polite Conversation, dialogue 2 (1738).

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Elegy Upon Tiger

Her dead lady's joy and comfort,
Who departed this life
The last day of March, 1727:
To the great joy of Bryan
That his antagonist is gone.

And is poor Tiger laid at last so low?
O day of sorrow! -Day of dismal woe!
Bloodhounds, or spaniels, lap-dogs, 'tis all one,

[Hata Bildir]