Oliver Herford

(1863-1935)

Quotations

  • ''She has a whim of iron.''
    Oliver Herford (1863-1935), U.S. poet, illustrator. Remark, attributed to Herford, referring to his wife. It reappeared in Excuse It Please, "Impossible Pudding" (1929), as "King Barumph has a whim of iron!"
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  • ''"We are nearer to Spring
    Than we were in September,"
    I heard a bird sing
    In the dark of December.''
    Oliver Herford (1863-1935), poet. I Heard a Bird Sing (l. 5-8). . . New Treasury of Children's Poetry, A; Old Favorites and New Discoveries. Joanna Cole, comp. (1984) Doubleday & Company.
  • ''Children, behold the Chimpanzee:
    He sits on the ancestral tree
    From which we sprang in ages gone.''
    Oliver Herford (1863-1935), poet. The Chimpanzee (l. 1-3). . . Nonsense Anthology, A. Carolyn Wells, comp. (1930) Charles Scribner's Sons (paperback edition of 1958 published by Dover Publications).
  • ''Sudden the wee Elf
    Smiled a wee smile,

    Tugged till the toadstool
    Toppled in two.
    Holding it over him
    Gaily he flew.''
    Oliver Herford (1863-1935), poet. The Elf and the Dormouse (l. 15-20). . . Family Book of Best Loved Poems, The. David L. George, ed. (1952) Doubleday & Company.
  • ''Ermined and minked and Persian-lambed,
    Be-puffed (be-painted, too, alas!)
    Be-decked, be-diamonded—be-damned!
    The Women of the Better Class.''
    Oliver Herford (1863-1935), U.S. poet, illustrator. The Women of the Better Class, st. 4.
  • ''Ermined and minked and Persian-lambed,
    Be-puffed (be-painted, too, alas!)
    Be-decked, be-diamonded—be-damned!
    The Women of the Better Class.''
    Oliver Herford (1863-1935), U.S. poet, illustrator. The Women of the Better Class.
  • ''Ermined and minked and Persian-lambed,
    Be-puffed (be-painted, too, alas!)
    Be-decked, be-diamonded be-damned!
    The Women of the Better Class.''
    Oliver Herford (1863-1935), U.S. poet, illustrator. The Women of the Better Class, st. 4.

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A Penguin

THE Pen-guin sits up-on the shore
And loves the lit-tle fish to bore;
He has one en-er-vat-ing joke
That would a very Saint provoke:
'The Pen-guin's might-i-er than the sword-fish';
He tells this dai-ly to the bored fish,
Un-til they are so weak, they float
With-out re-sis-tance down his throat.

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