Philip Freneau

(1752 - 1832)

Quotations

  • ''And long shall timorous fancy see
    The painted chief, and pointed spear,
    And Reason's self shall bow the knee
    To shadows and delusions here.''
    Philip Freneau (1752-1832), U.S. poet, sailor, journalist. The Indian Burying Ground (l. 37-40). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
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  • ''In spite of all the learned have said,
    I still my old opinion keep;
    The posture, that we give the dead,
    Points out the soul's eternal sleep.
    Not so the ancients of these lands—
    The Indian, when from life released,
    Again is seated with his friends,
    And shares again the joyous feast.''
    Philip Freneau (1752-1832), U.S. poet, sailor, journalist. The Indian Burying Ground (l. 1-8). WTO. New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
  • ''The flowers that did in Eden bloom;
    Unpitying frosts, and Autumn's power
    Shall leave no vestige of this flower.''
    Philip Freneau (1752-1832), U.S. poet, sailor, journalist. The Wild Honeysuckle (l. 16-18). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
  • ''At first thy little being came:
    If nothing once, you nothing lose,
    For when you die you are the same;
    The space between, is but an hour,
    The frail duration of a flower.''
    Philip Freneau (1752-1832), U.S. poet, sailor, journalist. The Wild Honeysuckle (l. 20-24). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Fair flower, that dost so comely grow,
    Hid in this silent, dull retreat,''
    Philip Freneau (1752-1832), U.S. poet, sailor, journalist. The Wild Honeysuckle (l. 1-2). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
  • ''At Eutaw Springs the valiant died;
    Their limbs with dust are covered o'er—
    Weep on, ye springs, your tearful tide;
    How many heroes are no more!''
    Philip Freneau (1752-1832), U.S. poet, sailor, journalist. To the Memory of the Brave Americans (l. 1-4). . . American Poetry and Prose. Norman Foerster, Norman S. Grabo, Russel B. Nye, E. Fred Carlisle, and Robert Falk, eds. (5th ed., 1970) Houghton Mifflin Company.
  • ''Now rest in peace, our patriot band;
    Though far from nature's limits thrown,
    We trust they find a happier land,
    A brighter sunshine of their own.''
    Philip Freneau (1752-1832), U.S. poet, sailor, journalist. To the Memory of the Brave Americans (l. 29-32). . . American Poetry and Prose. Norman Foerster, Norman S. Grabo, Russel B. Nye, E. Fred Carlisle, and Robert Falk, eds. (5th ed., 1970) Houghton Mifflin Company.

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To A New England Poet

Though skilled in Latin and in Greek,
And earning fifty cents a week,
Such knowledge, and the income, too,
Should teach you better what to do:
The meanest drudges, kept in pay,
Can pocket fifty cents a day.

Why stay in such a tasteless land,
Where all must on a level stand,

[Hata Bildir]