David Harris

(18 June 1945 / Bradfield, England)

A Australian Rose


For Betty Backhouse
Where ever you may be.

Way back in 1959
my parents, my sister and I.
Sailed from New York harbour
passed the Statue of Liberty
on an ocean liner called the RML Ivernia.
It was on this liner I met a girl slightly older than me,
who completely captivated me.
She was travelling with her parents and her brother.
They were from Australia
and her name was Betty.
She reminded me so much of my Canadian rose,
and the resemblance was uncanny.
The trip to England took seven nights and seven days.
Within those days,
she swept my heart completely away.
My biggest regret now is
I forgot to ask them where they lived in Australia.
When we docked in Southampton
in the December of that year,
amidst the rush and excitement
of returning to the land of my birth
I looked around and they were gone.
I often wonder how Betty and her brother ever got on.
That was almost fifty years ago
and hopes of ever seeing them are gone,
but I will always remember that Australian rose
until my final breath is taken away.
Should they ever read this by chance one day.
I hope that life has been wonderful to them both,
Betty and her brother where ever they may be.

3 June 2008

Submitted: Saturday, June 07, 2008

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  • Rookie - 503 Points Ruby Honeytip (12/2/2012 3:00:00 PM)

    This is truly lovely work: -)
    Thank you for sharing......I live in Australia.....I'll keep an eye out for Betty for you x (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 3 Points Vipins Puthooran (8/25/2011 6:26:00 AM)

    A nice poem conceiving so innocently in search of a lost traveller. I look up to this like not many hearts may be took away some part of our heart in a short period of time though we remember them at last of our breath somewhere in our hearts (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points Mohammad Akmal Nazir (5/2/2011 11:51:00 PM)

    Nice poem with plenty of depth. Beautifully conceived. Good vivid imagery.
    Great stuff.
    A perfect...10
    Thanks for sharing..... (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points Frank Cannon (6/12/2008 10:30:00 AM)

    Oh the pathos in this poem and such strong desire for there to be good reason for a follow up work... (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points JoAnn McGrath (6/7/2008 11:03:00 AM)

    sounds like a bit of a 'Titanic' love affair....so sweet and tender...it's amazing how one can connect with someone in such a short time....yet some still will not believe in love at first sight...and now the 'Internet Love' some not even seeing faces or hearing voices....to me everything is connected to words and how one relates...why many marriages fail....lack of words and communication...well I'm rattling on here...at any rate this was a wonderful moving poem...thanks for sharing Big Bruv: O) (Report) Reply

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