William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

A Narrow Girdle Of Rough Stones And Crags - Poem by William Wordsworth

A narrow girdle of rough stones and crags,
A rude and natural causeway, interposed
Between the water and a winding slope
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Comments about A Narrow Girdle Of Rough Stones And Crags by William Wordsworth

  • Gold Star - 16,098 Points * Sunprincess * (9/4/2012 10:01:00 PM)

    It is a shame Wordsworth didn't offer the sick and worn down man some food and rest...If he did then I admire him.. :) (Report) Reply

    10 person liked.
    7 person did not like.
  • Rookie Kevin Straw (9/4/2012 10:19:00 AM)

    What the place should have been called was A pound for charity. What a society that was when a man in such a state had no one to call on for help except the lake in which he, probably, fished in vain! And I have no doubt that he was immensely elevated by the sight of Wordsworth and Co staring at him as they rambled through the countryside whilst every one else was working their butts off! This thing the Romantics had for Nature was a towny's view, not a countryman's. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Arushi Thakur (9/4/2012 5:55:00 AM)

    Awesome poem I am using it for my recitation competition
    . (Report) Reply

  • Gold Star - 7,441 Points Douglas Scotney (12/31/2011 4:08:00 PM)

    In company of a different take
    The poet went out walking
    Down by Grasmere Lake.
    Dead calm the lake, no wind.

    With no Joanna to mock
    At the base of the rock,
    All three flew fancy free.
    William, Dorothy, STC
    Idled in the land of Poesy:
    Osmunda fern became
    A Naiad Queen,
    A fisherman miraged ahead
    Was Freedom at his leisure.
    But when up close, all fancies fled.
    Self-reproach replaced their pleasure.
    The fisherman was sick and gaunt,
    Freedom just a taunt.
    Dead the lake, no care.

    Point Rash-Judgement's what
    They named the spot.
    Had I put in my tuppence
    The point might be Comeuppance. (Report) Reply

  • Veteran Poet - 1,869 Points Ramesh T A (9/4/2011 1:42:00 PM)

    I feel I was also there to witness what the Nature poet has described in this poem of his own style and narration! A great model poet for all lovers of Nature like him in this world! Except him who else can be so keen and accurate to know all details and say interestingly for others too to vicariously enjoy what he has enjoyed then? (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Raj Nandy (11/15/2009 7:28:00 AM)

    I am simply amused to see a so called 'intelligent' reader trying to give rating to this great classical poet Wordsworth! May be under the delusion that he/she could write better verse! Poems of great Classical Poets, including Shakespeare,
    are made available by Poemhunter.com, for us to read, learn & appreciate! Let
    us not perform the sacrilege of trying to rate them, for in doing so we will only reveal our immaturity and ignorance! - From an old student of English Literature! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 44 Points Raman Savithiri (9/22/2009 1:16:00 AM)

    a true poet! not composing but pouring out! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Jimmy Wrangler (9/4/2009 3:40:00 PM)

    WOW... How many times has this proven to be so true! ! ! ! Wordsworth is a genius at getting you to look in a mirror! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 422 Points Ravi A (9/4/2009 11:44:00 AM)

    Life is like this. Wordsworth has often captured the picture of that man who lives in singular circumstances (Lucy Gray, Solitary reaper etc) . Wordsworth's message to the world is that every such man has a tale to tell the world about his singular existence. Wordsworth is indeed a poet who hasn't missed the stream of humanity. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Kevin Straw (9/4/2009 8:20:00 AM)

    The Wordsworth homeward plods his weary way - worthy words indeed! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Michael Pruchnicki (9/4/2008 11:09:00 AM)

    How 'verbous' indeed is the garbled comment by Davis. The poem's title is simply a repetition of the opening line. What 'old couple' does Davis refer to? The poet and two beloved friends are walking, taking in the sights and sharing the feelings aroused by the peaceful lake shore and the vegetation and the flotsam and jetsam deposited among the rough stones and crags. The sound of a crew harvesting crops prompts certain thoughts about the time of year when they sight a lone man standing on the shore ahead of them casting a line into the water. The three friends exchange comments about his improvidence, his evident lack of concern about the approaching winter when the fields will lie barren and the lake will be iced over.

    The last line of the poem - And POINT RASH-JUDGMENT is the name (the place where the angler stood) bears - indicates their misconception of why the man was not at work in the fields. The 'new-discovered coast' was the sudden realization that the man was too worn down and sick, too old to be harvesting grain with younger peasants.

    William Godwin was a novelist and political theorist (NOT a minister of religion cum political activist!) who had a great influence on English romantics, especially Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, and Byron. (Report) Reply

  • Veteran Poet - 1,725 Points p.a. noushad (6/7/2008 1:36:00 AM)

    how nature touches human life. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Elvira Davis (4/21/2005 12:37:00 AM)

    Wordsworth's title is appropriate for the mood of the poem which contrasts nicely fond feelings of intimacy and enjoyment of nature with the grim realisation of th old couple's existance. Even so, the old couple merge into the craggy landscape well. This poem is unlike many brief nature poems today, in that it is verbous. Wordsworth expands rather than deletes and compresses words for meaning. He was interested in poverty associated with old age which was highlighted by fellow writers, namely by William Godwin once Minister of Religion cum political activist / writer. (Report) Reply










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