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Amrit Rathi


A Tribute to my Boss


Some men see things as they are and say why,
I dream that never were and say, why not?
— Rober F. Keneddy


How often do you come across the one
who leaves an indelible mark on you?
For me, he was my boss, the CEO
of my company: its charm, its glue.

He was the leader who’d tell me to take
the driver’s seat, ‘n’ would sit in the back,
knew how to praise, and make me run,
and throw the challenge in a way that was fun.

I’d have an illusion as if I were the CEO,
and he would give me the latitude and power.
Even before the Board he’d vividly raise
my achievements, with a shower of praise.

I was too fast; he was reflective and slow.
All often said, it’s a deadly combination to go.
Together, we can achieve a lot, he would say,
and we can overcome the hurdles on the way.

A carefree guy the worries couldn’t touch.
while I thought: without being really serious,
we certainly cannot ever do much,
he said: “Work smart, not necessarily so hard!

Make the people feel important, they’d do
for you what you can’t even imagine.
Give generously but make a difference
between good and bad: that makes a sense.

Always look for the talent one has,
more than the skill sets that one can acquire.
If one has passion, long way one can go,
experience’s not always what you’d require.

The promotion upward is not necessarily good,
what’s the use of promoting Picasso to a manager! ”
We tried his offbeat ideas and saw the results:
imaginative, innovative, and successful as they were.

In the tight bureaucratic government’s structure
nothing seemed to move—but not for me ever.
I had reputation to manage somehow or the other.
This was India, but I got his full support and favor.

In a short time, we set up the big plants;
seven times we expanded beating deadlines;
I rushed the equipment against all odds;
motivated the team, and ignited their minds.

We traveled around the world on business,
building the company, enjoying the challenges;
life flew like a deeply gratifying dream;
we left behind a trail of rewards and successes.

By leaps and bounds, the company grew,
and it made a name with tremendous growth.
But then there was a sudden change in the Board
that proved short-sighted, attracting the sloth.

Most affected and sidetracked was this man,
my boss: he bore this all with a heavy heart.
Too old to restart a new career elsewhere,
he looked to me for that he wished to share.

I was still young; I certainly could have changed,
but didn’t want to leave him alone to suffer,
I adored him; for me he had a special love, regard,
so I stayed on though the situation got rougher.

He was thirty years older than me but as if
he was a buddy, a guide with loving kindness.
Twenty-seven years, a major span of lifetime,
was a rainbow of joys, sorrows, and togetherness.

Gradually he lost his health, and was one day gone;
his wife told me he was calling me while he died.
O, I can only but cherish his long company, his love,
and a deep bond, enjoyment, thrill, and pride.

O heart, what do you after all so much grieve;
for in the memories, he shall always live!


Copyright © reserved by the author

Submitted: Saturday, May 22, 2010
Edited: Monday, November 22, 2010

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  • Rookie Mathew Brady (6/2/2010 12:52:00 AM)

    A great poem of gratitude embedded with sentiments not normally found! I looks like you really had great time in work and achievement. I rated it 9/10. Keep writing....Thanks. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie warner treuter (6/1/2010 8:25:00 PM)

    Like two poems in one, poem starts out descriptively about job, etc. and ends up very personal,
    interesting all the way. Perhaps, though we retain the memories of someone highly cherished we cannot help but wish them actual life as a process of giving and sharing that is in all generous natures.
    If you haven't already noticed - or if things are not similar to the U.S. companies, almost all except the very highest of employees get terminated in their middle or late fifties. Don't know why, perhaps it's because people get sick then and cause a drag on the insurance rates. Even the best companies here that have a lot of appreciation from their employees do not breed a whole lot of confidence in, and get even less loyalty from, their employees compared to a couple of generations ago. Most skilled computer employees here would switch jobs at the dropp of a hat with very little notice if it was to their advantage, and this is because they've seen all too well what happened to those who've gone before and can't refurbish their knowledge and skills almost overnight to keep up with changing times. No loyalty from the company breeds no loyalty from their workers. Accepted protocol here in the states. Just not supposed to broadcast it, bad for morale, but perfectly ok to admit it outside of the plant or over a beer. Modern life. Industrial ethics. It's here. But you probably already know that. Unless, it is to be hoped, India is yet undevelopmentally more pristine. I think the world of loyalty, a high honor, a high virtue; unfortunately not in vogue at this time in the States. Your poem was very noble along these lines, I thought. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie majid Alsaady (5/30/2010 11:32:00 AM)

    Dear Amrit

    Being faithful is a great and excellent merit.You not praised your boss but yourself. showing such nice sentiments, personal ya, but humane.
    thanks for the invite. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Ramesh Adwant (5/26/2010 9:58:00 PM)

    Hi Amrit,
    read your poem.The real punch is in the last two lines. Those who accept us with an open heart make a special place in our memory. Your poem was probably a result of your love and admiration for your boss. A good poem indeed. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Valery Atkinson (5/25/2010 10:41:00 AM)

    You seem to be an excellent human being who has such adoration for your ex-boss. Your poem is reflection of your nice feelings and sentiments. And Amrit, you have knack of sprinkling nuggets of wisdom(management related here) in each of your poems, I consider it your greatest achievement as a poet.Thank you very much! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 25 Points Nivedita Bagchi SPC UK (5/22/2010 11:06:00 AM)

    ‘And throw the challenge in way that is fun.’…to accept a challenge requires grit and adventurous

    ‘For in the memories he shall be always alive! ’ such types of boss always stay as engraved in the hearts of juniors and deserves so…

    Your indebtedness to your boss is amazing…and encouraging to youngs too
    10+.
    Ms. Nivedita
    UK (Report) Reply

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