John Donne

(24 January 1572 - 31 March 1631 / London, England)

A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning - Poem by John Donne

As virtuous men pass mildly away,
And whisper to their souls, to go,
Whilst some of their sad friends do say,
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Comments about A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning by John Donne

  • Gold Star - 29,119 Points Gangadharan Nair Pulingat (9/5/2014 11:27:00 PM)

    Marriage between two minds, two individuals is a very important relationship upto the end of life most of the circumstances. Love is important thing for a marriage relation. Here the poet beautifully made a poem of the different aspects of life and even the death situation which it is made so beautiful and at the same time make sad emotions in the mind which is a positiveness of the poem. Making others feel through a poem as if it is a genuine life situation is not so bad. I very much liked the poem as a reader and also felt. (Report) Reply

    3 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Rookie Dr Aslam (2/19/2014 5:27:00 AM)

    love is immortal.... ah john donne....grt poet of the world... king of metaphysical poems..... (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Anastasia Markova (9/5/2013 5:10:00 AM)

    Nice! The style is pretty well. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Kevin Straw (9/5/2012 11:59:00 AM)

    What Donne elevates in this poem is the marriage of true minds. A relationship based on sensual attraction is vulnerable to absence, but a relationship based on a love which is not dependent on the senses is stronger. What a pity that those who give such a poem low marks cannot be asked to justify themselves. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie E Backus (6/4/2012 3:50:00 AM)

    Though the distance away from one another seems surmountable and the speaker - due to the gravity of the beloved - ends where I begun, isn't it sad that carrying out the full conceit means the two lovers will never meet? The speaker relies on the beloved for a reference point, but as a compass, they will act like repelling magnets, influencing each other's movements but never touching.: ( (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Francis X. Burns (4/17/2012 5:44:00 PM)

    One of the masterworks of English poetry, the epitome of the metaphysical style. Period. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Mary Valva (1/15/2012 8:53:00 AM)

    Why can't I print this poem? (Report) Reply

  • Freshman - 678 Points Ramesh T A (9/5/2011 4:37:00 PM)

    Metaphysical poems of John Donne are well known in literary circle. The imagery of compass expressing the idea of two lovers in union is wonderful indeed! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Kevin Straw (9/5/2009 4:49:00 AM)

    I remember first reading JD and, without understanding fully what I was reading, becoming transfixed by the poetry. My first league poets are Shakespeare, Donne and Blake. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 3 Points Emily Oldham (6/21/2009 5:22:00 AM)

    I just love Donne'/s style of writing... this poem is amazing. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Margaret Carruthers (9/5/2008 4:50:00 AM)

    A beautiful, soulful, spiritual poem full of truth that is not often acknowledged. So thought provoking. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Dorothy Healy (9/5/2007 1:07:00 PM)

    I think this beautiful poem is very sad.
    When the spiritual and the physical join,
    that is sustenance, the perfect golden circle. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Marina R (1/19/2007 10:17:00 PM)

    This poem is beautifuly written. Donnes idea of love on a spiritual level rather than on a physical one is an idea that I feel should be shared with the world. (Report) Reply










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