Learn More

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

(28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832 / Frankfurt am Main)

Previous Month April 2014 Next Month
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
31 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 1 2 3 4
Poem of the Day
Select a day from the calendar.
Would you like to see the poem of the day in your e-mail box every morning?
Your email address:
  Subscribe FREE
  Unsubscribe

After-Sensations


WHEN the vine again is blowing,
Then the wine moves in the cask;
When the rose again is glowing,
........................
........................
read full text »


Do you like this poem?
0 person liked.
0 person did not like.

What do you think this poem is about?



Comments about this poem (After-Sensations by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe )

Enter the verification code :

  • Rookie - 393 Points Michelle Claus (4/30/2014 11:18:00 PM)

    I don't have much to add after Daniel Brick's great commentary, except to say that I enjoyed Mr. Brick's back story on Goethe more than I enjoyed the poem itself. The poem strikes me as okay, but not amazing. Without the back story to give the poem heft, it's just... okay. (Report) Reply

  • Veteran Poet - 4,393 Points Daniel Brick (4/30/2014 7:42:00 PM)

    The first volume of the biography of Goethe by the contemporary English scholar Nicholas Boyle is called THE POETRY OF DESIRE; it covers his life up to age 41 in 1790. The second volume is called REVOLUTION AND RENUNCIATION, and it only covers 13 years until age 54. In those years of explosive political upheaval, Goethe was reassessing his life, ultimately rejecting the life of pervasive desire, which had nourished him body and soul from youth to early middle age, and replacing desire with a heightened awareness of friendship, fidelity and felicity. I hope my alliteration makes this sound attractive. It is so hard to give up our desires, but that is also the essential teaching of Buddhism, where desire is called attachment and the goal is freedom from attachments of all kinds. Goethe did not aspire to achieve that extreme of renunciation, and in fact struggled for the rest of his long life with the real presence of desires. That is probably the reason for the bittersweet notes of this poem and it's curious inability to either fully embrace or deny the pleasures of spring. Wisdom really complicates life. doesn't it? Oh, for a life of sensations, cried the very young John Keats. I'm with you on that one, John! (Report) Reply

  • Gold Star - 10,762 Points Gangadharan Nair Pulingat (4/30/2014 9:32:00 AM)

    Goethe's poems while reading it is thought that the super genius thinker's thoughts came into words and poems an ordinary mind cannot go indepth of it. However the poem in its general essence and recitation felt very nice. (Report) Reply

PoemHunter.com Updates

New Poems

  1. WHO'LL TAKE THE MARK?, Michael P. Johnson
  2. जिउनि दाइरियाव,2011, Ronjoy Brahma
  3. DESIGNED BY GOD, Subbaraman N V
  4. I am a spoil, Naveed Khalid
  5. Nursery rhyme - Dynosaur, S.D. TIWARI
  6. The darkness, Gangadharan nair Pulingat..
  7. Beautiful Soup, Lewis Carroll
  8. Afternoon in School The Last Lesson, David Herbert Lawrence
  9. The Nature of Sorrow, Karan Patade
  10. Ms. butterfly, Kenneth Maswabi

Poem of the Day

poet Christopher Marlowe

Black is the beauty of the brightest day,
The golden belle of heaven's eternal fire,
That danced with glory on the silver waves,
Now wants the fuel that inflamed his beams:
...... Read complete »

   

Trending Poems

  1. 04 Tongues Made Of Glass, Shaun Shane
  2. Still I Rise, Maya Angelou
  3. The Road Not Taken, Robert Frost
  4. If You Forget Me, Pablo Neruda
  5. If, Rudyard Kipling
  6. November, Thomas Hood
  7. Invictus, William Ernest Henley
  8. Daffodils, William Wordsworth
  9. Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night, Dylan Thomas
  10. The Innkeeper’s Wife, Clive Sansom

Trending Poets

[Hata Bildir]