jordan sampson

Rookie (10/02/93 / Maplewood, New Jersey)

Alone in the night Poem by jordan sampson


I imagine how it would be if I were up there with no air
All alone in the night
The stars makes it bright
........................
........................
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Comments about this poem (Alone in the night by jordan sampson )

  • Rookie Kate E (10/15/2013 2:52:00 PM)

    I think this poem could show a little more emotion but i like the start of it and how it sets a scene. (Report) Reply

    1 person liked.
    2 person did not like.
  • Rookie Yenifer Mendoza (10/15/2013 2:52:00 PM)

    it is very poetic! ! ! ! ! ! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie John Kim (9/22/2013 8:39:00 PM)

    I agree with your opinion. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Bob Crackhead (5/13/2013 9:26:00 AM)

    i agree she is a titty nun but she was probably adopted at the age of 69 seeya bro (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Bob Crackhead (4/29/2013 8:51:00 AM)

    There are three indent options: left, first, and right. Right indentation is fairly self explanatory, but it is important to be aware of the difference between left and first. It's important to note that if you put in the same value for First and Left indentation, the first line of the paragraph will be indented double the value, as both functions are applied at the same time. First affects only the first line of a paragraph (a paragraph is defined as a block of text offset by carriage returns, which are inserted when you press the key) . Left, on the other hand, affects the entire paragraph.

    You may also insert preset spaces or ruler lines above or below each paragraph. This is especially helpful for defining the amount of white space that is to surround text, as carriage returns merely insert the amount space defined by the current font. As you may realize, fonts each have their own specifications, so having a ruler length of space defined is helpful if several fonts are being used. Rule lines can be inserted by clicking the Rules... button, after which you can choose the line style, color, and indent. Ruler length may also be set in the Options dialog.

    HYPHENATION
    The issue of hyphenation is a tricky one. Some people prefer to never see words hyphenated, while others prefer to avoid the whitespace often caused by not using hyphens. It's always a good idea to investigate the hyphenation styles preferred by your department or work organization.

    To change hyphenation settings for your document, go to the Hyphenation dialog accessible through the arrow menu on the Paragraph palette. You may choose to fully turn off hyphenation or use it only under certain circumstances. Remember, however, that grammatical rules always have exceptions, so expecting InDesign to always perfectly hyphenate is unrealistic.There are three indent options: left, first, and right. Right indentation is fairly self explanatory, but it is important to be aware of the difference between left and first. It's important to note that if you put in the same value for First and Left indentation, the first line of the paragraph will be indented double the value, as both functions are applied at the same time. First affects only the first line of a paragraph (a paragraph is defined as a block of text offset by carriage returns, which are inserted when you press the key) . Left, on the other hand, affects the entire paragraph.

    You may also insert preset spaces or ruler lines above or below each paragraph. This is especially helpful for defining the amount of white space that is to surround text, as carriage returns merely insert the amount space defined by the current font. As you may realize, fonts each have their own specifications, so having a ruler length of space defined is helpful if several fonts are being used. Rule lines can be inserted by clicking the Rules... button, after which you can choose the line style, color, and indent. Ruler length may also be set in the Options dialog.

    HYPHENATION
    The issue of hyphenation is a tricky one. Some people prefer to never see words hyphenated, while others prefer to avoid the whitespace often caused by not using hyphens. It's always a good idea to investigate the hyphenation styles preferred by your department or work organization.

    To change hyphenation settings for your document, go to the Hyphenation dialog accessible through the arrow menu on the Paragraph palette. You may choose to fully turn off hyphenation or use it only under certain circumstances. Remember, however, that grammatical rules always have exceptions, so expecting InDesign to always perfectly hyphenate is unrealistic.There are three indent options: left, first, and right. Right indentation is fairly self explanatory, but it is important to be aware of the difference between left and first. It's important to note that if you put in the same value for First and Left indentation, the first line of the paragraph will be indented double the value, as both functions are applied at the same time. First affects only the first line of a paragraph (a paragraph is defined as a block of text offset by carriage returns, which are inserted when you press the key) . Left, on the other hand, affects the entire paragraph.

    You may also insert preset spaces or ruler lines above or below each paragraph. This is especially helpful for defining the amount of white space that is to surround text, as carriage returns merely insert the amount space defined by the current font. As you may realize, fonts each have their own specifications, so having a ruler length of space defined is helpful if several fonts are being used. Rule lines can be inserted by clicking the Rules... button, after which you can choose the line style, color, and indent. Ruler length may also be set in the Options dialog.

    HYPHENATION
    The issue of hyphenation is a tricky one. Some people prefer to never see words hyphenated, while others prefer to avoid the whitespace often caused by not using hyphens. It's always a good idea to investigate the hyphenation styles preferred by your department or work organization.

    To change hyphenation settings for your document, go to the Hyphenation dialog accessible through the arrow menu on the Paragraph palette. You may choose to fully turn off hyphenation or use it only under certain circumstances. Remember, however, that grammatical rules always have exceptions, so expecting InDesign to always perfectly hyphenate is unrealistic.There are three indent options: left, first, and right. Right indentation is fairly self explanatory, but it is important to be aware of the difference between left and first. It's important to note that if you put in the same value for First and Left indentation, the first line of the paragraph will be indented double the value, as both functions are applied at the same time. First affects only the first line of a paragraph (a paragraph is defined as a block of text offset by carriage returns, which are inserted when you press the key) . Left, on the other hand, affects the entire paragraph.

    You may also insert preset spaces or ruler lines above or below each paragraph. This is especially helpful for defining the amount of white space that is to surround text, as carriage returns merely insert the amount space defined by the current font. As you may realize, fonts each have their own specifications, so having a ruler length of space defined is helpful if several fonts are being used. Rule lines can be inserted by clicking the Rules... button, after which you can choose the line style, color, and indent. Ruler length may also be set in the Options dialog.

    HYPHENATION
    The issue of hyphenation is a tricky one. Some people prefer to never see words hyphenated, while others prefer to avoid the whitespace often caused by not using hyphens. It's always a good idea to investigate the hyphenation styles preferred by your department or work organization.

    To change hyphenation settings for your document, go to the Hyphenation dialog accessible through the arrow menu on the Paragraph palette. You may choose to fully turn off hyphenation or use it only under certain circumstances. Remember, however, that grammatical rules always have exceptions, so expecting InDesign to always perfectly hyphenate is unrealistic.There are three indent options: left, first, and right. Right indentation is fairly self explanatory, but it is important to be aware of the difference between left and first. It's important to note that if you put in the same value for First and Left indentation, the first line of the paragraph will be indented double the value, as both functions are applied at the same time. First affects only the first line of a paragraph (a paragraph is defined as a block of text offset by carriage returns, which are inserted when you press the key) . Left, on the other hand, affects the entire paragraph.

    You may also insert preset spaces or ruler lines above or below each paragraph. This is especially helpful for defining the amount of white space that is to surround text, as carriage returns merely insert the amount space defined by the current font. As you may realize, fonts each have their own specifications, so having a ruler length of space defined is helpful if several fonts are being used. Rule lines can be inserted by clicking the Rules... button, after which you can choose the line style, color, and indent. Ruler length may also be set in the Options dialog.

    HYPHENATION
    The issue of hyphenation is a tricky one. Some people prefer to never see words hyphenated, while others prefer to avoid the whitespace often caused by not using hyphens. It's always a good idea to investigate the hyphenation styles preferred by your department or work organization.

    To change hyphenation settings for your document, go to the Hyphenation dialog accessible through the arrow menu on the Paragraph palette. You may choose to fully turn off hyphenation or use it only under certain circumstances. Remember, however, that grammatical rules always have exceptions, so expecting InDesign to always perfectly hyphenate is unrealistic.There are three indent options: left, first, and right. Right indentation is fairly self explanatory, but it is important to be aware of the difference between left and first. It's important to note that if you put in the same value for First and Left indentation, the first line of the paragraph will be indented double the value, as both functions are applied at the same time. First affects only the first line of a paragraph (a paragraph is defined as a block of text offset by carriage returns, which are inserted when you press the key) . Left, on the other hand, affects the entire paragraph.

    You may also insert preset spaces or ruler lines above or below each paragraph. This is especially helpful for defining the amount of white space that is to surround text, as carriage returns merely insert the amount space defined by the current font. As you may realize, fonts each have their own specifications, so having a ruler length of space defined is helpful if several fonts are being used. Rule lines can be inserted by clicking the Rules... button, after which you can choose the line style, color, and indent. Ruler length may also be set in the Options dialog.

    HYPHENATION
    The issue of hyphenation is a tricky one. Some people prefer to never see words hyphenated, while others prefer to avoid the whitespace often caused by not using hyphens. It's always a good idea to investigate the hyphenation styles preferred by your department or work organization.

    To change hyphenation settings for your document, go to the Hyphenation dialog accessible through the arrow menu on the Paragraph palette. You may choose to fully turn off hyphenation or use it only under certain circumstances. Remember, however, that grammatical rules always have exceptions, so expecting InDesign to always perfectly hyphenate is unrealistic. There are three indent options: left, first, and right. Right indentation is fairly self explanatory, but it is important to be aware of the difference between left and first. It's important to note that if you put in the same value for First and Left indentation, the first line of the paragraph will be indented double the value, as both functions are applied at the same time. First affects only the first line of a paragraph (a paragraph is defined as a block of text offset by carriage returns, which are inserted when you press the key) . Left, on the other hand, affects the entire paragraph.

    You may also insert preset spaces or ruler lines above or below each paragraph. This is especially helpful for defining the amount of white space that is to surround text, as carriage returns merely insert the amount space defined by the current font. As you may realize, fonts each have their own specifications, so having a ruler length of space defined is helpful if several fonts are being used. Rule lines can be inserted by clicking the Rules... button, after which you can choose the line style, color, and indent. Ruler length may also be set in the Options dialog.

    HYPHENATION
    The issue of hyphenation is a tricky one. Some people prefer to never see words hyphenated, while others prefer to avoid the whitespace often caused by not using hyphens. It's always a good idea to investigate the hyphenation styles preferred by your department or work organization. The Paragraph as Information Technology: How News Traveled in the Eighteenth-Century
    Atlantic World
    My paper will provide a brief but important chapter in the history of the paragraph.
    Specialists of the printed book like Henri-Jean Martin and Roger Laufer have argued that the
    use of paragraph breaks became more and more common in the late 17th and early 18th
    centuries and they have explored how the fragmentation of texts transformed royal
    proclamations, law codes, philosophical treatises, and of course novels. Yet the news, which
    was bursting into print at the same time, was also transformed by the paragraph. And it was in
    the columns of the 18th-century newspaper that the paragraph took on a new political
    significance, becoming a distinct genre of publicity and an expedient vehicle for transmitting
    messages abroad.
    Every eighteenth-century newspaper was composed of other newspapers, and the news they
    contained depended upon the patterns of communication between them. Printers, editors and
    readers referred to “paragraphs” to distinguish textual objects that were “copied from” or
    “inserted in” such and such a newspaper. They mocked “paragraph writers” working to
    advance various political and financial interests. In the printing shop, composing the
    newspaper became a game of paragraphs: one had to select, modify and rearrange content
    from a range of sources to fill the available space. The paragraph had strayed far from the
    Scholastic world in which the “paragraphus” indicated the next proposition in a chain of
    argumentation. In liberating the paragraph from what preceded it and from what followed it,
    18th-century journalism established a new regime of politicized writing. A paragraph written
    in Boston could have a strange afterlife in London, Amsterdam and Madrid.
    My claim is that the paragraph was the essential information technology that made
    international news possible before the telegraph, CNN or the Internet. The phenomenon was
    not limited to the English-language world because gazettes in French, Dutch, German, Italian
    and Spanish all translated heavily from the London press, which John Adams described as “an
    engine by which everything is scattered all over the world.” But interdependence did not
    mean uniformity. Therefore, my presentation will include a detailed reconstruction of how a
    particular news story evolved as it traveled from North America to Britain and from there to
    France and beyond.

    To change hyphenation settings for your document, go to the Hyphenation dialog accessible through the arrow menu on the Paragraph palette. You may choose to fully turn off hyphenation or use it only under certain circumstances. Remember, however, that grammatical rules always have exceptions, so expecting InDesign to always perfectly hyphenate is unrealistic.There are three indent options: left, first, and right. Right indentation is fairly self explanatory, but it is important to be aware of the difference between left and first. It's important to note that if you put in the same value for First and Left indentation, the first line of the paragraph will be indented double the value, as both functions are applied at the same time. First affects only the first line of a paragraph (a paragraph is defined as a block of text offset by carriage returns, which are inserted when you press the key) . Left, on the other hand, affects the entire paragraph.

    You may also insert preset spaces or ruler lines above or below each paragraph. This is especially helpful for defining the amount of white space that is to surround text, as carriage returns merely insert the amount space defined by the current font. As you may realize, fonts each have their own specifications, so having a ruler length of space defined is helpful if several fonts are being used. Rule lines can be inserted by clicking the Rules... button, after which you can choose the line style, color, and indent. Ruler length may also be set in the Options dialog.

    HYPHENATION
    The issue of hyphenation is a tricky one. Some people prefer to never see words hyphenated, while others prefer to avoid the whitespace often caused by not using hyphens. It's always a good idea to investigate the hyphenation styles preferred by your department or work organization.

    To change hyphenation settings for your document, go to the Hyphenation dialog accessible through the arrow menu on the Paragraph palette. You may choose to fully turn off hyphenation or use it only under certain circumstances. Remember, however, that grammatical rules always have exceptions, so expecting InDesign to always perfectly hyphenate is unrealistic. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Yor Momma Last Night In Her Bed (4/24/2013 9:36:00 AM)

    Bro sersiously i thinkl you were adopted at the age of 20. You were probably a titty baby to a nun. Sorry bro can't help it lot of luck! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Yor Momma Last Night In Her Bed (4/22/2013 9:09:00 AM)

    is what i said to yo momma last night (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Jeannette Chung (3/5/2013 12:35:00 PM)

    Jeanette Chung thinks she is alone as well.
    Maybe Jeanette Chung can be alone with you. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Sara Tehrani (2/24/2013 1:16:00 PM)

    Beautiful and with an idea that Ive never come discovered, so quite unique, you have a wide imagination :) (Report) Reply

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