Treasure Island

Sir Philip Sidney

(1554 - 1586 / Kent / England)

Astrophel and Stella: I


ASTROPHEL AND STELLA: I
Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show,
That she, dear she, might take some pleasure of my pain,--
Pleasure might cause her read, reading might make her know,
Knowledge might pity win, and pity grace obtain,--
I sought fit words to paint the blackest face of woe;
Studying inventions fine her wits to entertain,
Oft turning others' leaves, to see if thence would flow
Some fresh and fruitful showers upon my sunburn'd brain.
But words came halting forth, wanting invention's stay;
Invention, Nature's child, fled step-dame Study's blows;
And others' feet still seem'd but strangers in my way.
Thus great with child to speak and helpless in my throes,
Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite,
"Fool," said my Muse to me, "look in thy heart, and write."

Submitted: Thursday, January 01, 2004

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  • William F Dougherty (4/25/2012 7:14:00 PM)

    Sidney's keynote sonnet in a sonnet series (Astrophel and Stella) which, along with Shakespeare's and Spenser's sonnet series formed the lyric foundation of the literary Renaissance. (Report) Reply

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