Learn More

Ralph Waldo Emerson

(1803 - 1882 / Boston / United States)

Previous Month November 2014 Next Month
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
27 28 29 30 31 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
Poem of the Day
Select a day from the calendar.
Would you like to see the poem of the day in your e-mail box every morning?
Your email address:
  Subscribe FREE
  Unsubscribe

Dirge


Knows he who tills this lonely field
To reap its scanty corn,
What mystic fruit his acres yield
........................
........................
read full text »


Do you like this poem?
7 person liked.
1 person did not like.

Comments about this poem (Dirge by Ralph Waldo Emerson )

Enter the verification code :

  • Gold Star - 12,810 Points Deepak Kumar Pattanayak (11/24/2014 10:48:00 PM)

    Oh this is beauty, nostalgic in every respect, emotions outpouring....really touches my heart.....amazing piece......
    thanks for sharing....... (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 866 Points John Richter (11/24/2014 8:24:00 AM)

    The Master's Requiem - such an incredible ageless thought. That one's heart can not be unlocked because the key left with those loved who left before him. A shining example of why Emerson is one of the greatest poets ever. This ending completely rounds the loss of those loved so perfectly. There is no reason why we suffer such great loss, less God's will. How beautifully he phrases this ageless belief. (Report) Reply

  • Gold Star - 33,871 Points Aftab Alam Khursheed (11/24/2014 1:13:00 AM)

    the poem titled DIRGE and described beautifully ended with the last word- REQUIEM - - Funeral and its ritual very nice (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Sixtus Osim (11/24/2013 1:53:00 PM)

    I can't imagine being through such pains
    Of losing a dear one within my yard
    Lest siblings of mine in prime days
    Then wander along ugly paths..

    Painful indeed, that Emerson is not just talking about how we are going to meet where we are to reunite, but expressing his dim, hollow heart of missing almost all, except a vague promise to meet with his lost ones again. (Report) Reply

  • Veteran Poet - 3,470 Points Savita Tyagi (11/24/2013 10:12:00 AM)

    Long but enjoyable! Enjoyed Sidi Mahtrow's short one even more. Thanks for sharing. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 130 Points Sidi Mahtrow (11/24/2012 9:31:00 AM)

    Once we trod these virgin acres
    Thoughts free and pure
    No image of growing old
    Or losing that for which we were bold
    Now they lie moldering in the dirt
    Bones, bleached and white
    Only their memory lingers on
    Strong liquor does not atone
    For I wait to gain presence there
    Where we will be reunited, there is no despair.

    s
    (For those who found Emerson's poem too long.) (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Cherryl Delan (11/24/2012 3:58:00 AM)

    the gift of family, of having brothers and sisters to grow up with. i am blessed to have such. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Kevin Straw (11/24/2009 5:55:00 AM)

    This is a wonderful elegy to Emerson’s boyhood spent roaming in the countryside with his brothers now dead. It recalls for me the first verse of Wordsworth's Immortality Ode:

    THERE was a time when meadow, grove, and stream,
    The earth, and every common sight,
    To me did seem
    Apparell'd in celestial light,
    The glory and the freshness of a dream. 5
    It is not now as it hath been of yore; —
    Turn wheresoe'er I may,
    By night or day,
    The things which I have seen I now can see no more. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 294 Points Ramesh T A (11/24/2009 1:17:00 AM)

    A long meaningful poem by Emerson in praise of plough man lonely is praiseworthy! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie surya . (11/24/2008 3:47:00 AM)

    Hi Ralph
    I find this poem as a serious effort. Your mind seems firm on the idea. Very good poem.Congrats.
    sury surya (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Mary Burnette (11/24/2007 11:15:00 AM)

    As a dirge, this poem is successful. But so full of despair that its message of remembrances of things past is almost lost. I don't know nearly enough about Ralph Waldo Emerson's life to know his circumstances were when he wrote the poem, but it was depressing to me. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Amanda Ngcobo (11/21/2007 1:36:00 PM)

    Its to long and this poet has a similar style to Silvia Plath (I dislike her poetry to a certain extent) (Report) Reply

Trending Poets

Trending Poems

  1. Invictus, William Ernest Henley
  2. The Saddest Poem, Pablo Neruda
  3. The Road Not Taken, Robert Frost
  4. If, Rudyard Kipling
  5. Do Not Stand At My Grave And Weep, Mary Elizabeth Frye
  6. If You Forget Me, Pablo Neruda
  7. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, Robert Frost
  8. Dreams, Langston Hughes
  9. Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night, Dylan Thomas
  10. XVII (I do not love you...), Pablo Neruda

Poem of the Day

poet James Whitcomb Riley

There! little girl; don't cry!
They have broken your doll, I know;
And your tea-set blue,
And your play-house, too,
Are things of the long ago;
...... Read complete »

   

New Poems

  1. leaving the dream ajar, Mandolyn ...
  2. Androids in my Dream, Rachel Nichols
  3. The Day Before Christmas 1968, Kyle Schlicher
  4. Tocaña, Nassy Fesharaki
  5. Haze your Dream, Antonio Liao
  6. With gun yielding, hasmukh amathalal
  7. Along with many, hasmukh amathalal
  8. No other culture, hasmukh amathalal
  9. A Splendor Beauty, Hanh Chau
  10. With all, hasmukh amathalal