Dylan Thomas

(27 October 1914 – 9 November 1953 / Swansea / Wales)

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Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night


Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
........................
........................
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Comments about this poem (Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night by Dylan Thomas )

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  • Rookie Edward Quinn (12/12/2007 4:20:00 PM)

    This poem has inspired me since I first read it many years ago. As my life moves on its meaning grows stronger. I do not believe Thomas was defying death. Rather he was crushed by the sight of seeing his father being cut down by its inevitability. His wish was to see his father strong to the end. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points Edgar Eslit (9/7/2007 2:14:00 AM)

    Saint Francis of Assisi got his “transitus” welcoming death and called it 'sister death”. In contrary, Dylan Thomas is asking his father to fight and go against it. “Rage, rage against the dying of the light” so goes the last line of his poem, Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night. No one escapes death but if we are to follow Dylan’s logic; he seemed to be ensuing that death can be defied. No body can. With these two uncompromising ideas, humility is what I’ve learn. It’s such a perspective which could have been thrown to trash without them. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie James Milks (9/6/2007 12:08:00 PM)

    This poem has always been a favorite of mine; poems like this one with the power and conviction of the writer are what interested me in poetry in the first place. I can still see Rodney Daingerfield’s powerful reading of this poem in “Back to School” and I actually took part of the line that Daingerfield had used (with full credit of course) when asked what the poem meant to him he said “..I don’t take shit from no one.” (yes I used the word shit in a college paper) and to me that is exactly what it means you don’t just take anything, not even death from anybody. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points Francois Hoon (7/10/2007 6:13:00 PM)

    What a great poem - it contains wisdom of life. Life should not be a struggle to arrive safely at death, for then you have not lived. Get as much out of it as possible, because we only have one, and it is short.
    http: //www.poemhunter.com/francois-hoon (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Verushka Naidoo (5/9/2007 12:56:00 AM)

    I was introduced to this poem at school, about 12 years ago and although 'old english' was hard to absorb this poem was one of the few that have stayed with me through the years. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Falease Anderson (5/8/2007 12:47:00 PM)

    This was my first time reading this classic. I had always heard the title but had never read the poem.It is a masterpiece. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 29 Points Robert Howard (12/13/2006 9:04:00 AM)

    In response to Laura's question, the form is Villanelle. The rhyme scheme and line repetition is exactly what you see in Thomas's masterpiece.

    The poet uses the repeating lines to hammer home his defiance of death which elevates a usually pastoral genre to one that expresses great depth of emotion. I wholeheartedly agree with all comments about the absolute greatness of this poem. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Laura McPharren (9/14/2006 9:28:00 AM)

    I am curious as to what the form of the poem is and its effect on the poem. What exactly is the deeper meaning? How do the rhyming stanzas have an effect on the meaning of the poem?

    Thanks. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Brian Dorn (7/20/2006 12:28:00 PM)

    A lesson to never give up on life. There is so much left undone, so much potential unfulfilled. Make the most of life or regret what could have been... a powerful message. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Dee Daffodil (6/10/2006 9:16:00 AM)

    I love this poem...no wonder it's a classic...full of spirit...full of life to the bitter end! Awesome! ! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 22 Points Robert Louis Dummett (10/18/2005 4:01:00 AM)

    Villanelles are a pain to write well. Nevertheless, the master tackles it and creates what must surely be among the very best of poems ever written. Brilliant and flawless! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Ronberge . (8/19/2005 12:44:00 AM)

    This is one of my all time favorites!
    Superbly written, ... no repetitions in rhyming ends 'ight' and 'ay'...Great alteration of last lines of stanza that are brought together in the final one.
    Powerfully-charged sustained emotion throughout...
    This one is truly a classic!

    Ronberge (Report) Reply

  • Rookie John Lock (3/2/2005 3:07:00 PM)

    Rage & roar, rage & roar,
    The flesh will rot & the spirt soar.
    No more will heart spent tears fall,
    At grave side when the trump does call. (Report) Reply

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