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William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

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Hark! Hark! The Lark


Hark! hark! the lark at heaven's gate sings,
And Phoebus 'gins arise,
His steeds to water at those springs
........................
........................
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  • Carlos Echeverria (2/8/2012 10:25:00 AM)

    Duke Ellington admired Shakespeare, saying about: he must've spent a lot of time on the street corner. (Report) Reply

  • Manonton Dalan (2/8/2012 4:24:00 AM)

    genius tend to over analyzed things
    but for a simple man with simple mind
    this could be just early morning when
    sun is barely rising; horses drinks on
    spring; wake-up my lady-rise and shine. (Report) Reply

  • Kevin Straw (2/8/2010 6:59:00 AM)

    This seems awkward for Shakespeare: 'His steeds to water at those springs/On chaliced flowers that lies...'

    I google the following which sets the lyric in the play:

    In Shakespeare's Cymbeline, Cloten uses lewd language to talk about Cymbeline. In an attempt to use musicians to court her, he calls on them to play 'a wonderful sweet air'. The hark, hark! ... line is chosen to represent sweetness and refinement, as a counterpoint to the previous crudities. (Report) Reply

  • Joseph Poewhit (2/8/2010 6:07:00 AM)

    Seems like a flowery love poem of the era. BUT, he was the playwright and still is today. A psychoanalysis before the word was in vogue (Report) Reply

  • Terence George Craddock (2/8/2010 2:38:00 AM)

    An interesting analogy, Phoebus the god Apollo and a personification of the sun, arises and waters his spirited horses using chaliced flowers like a communion cup. With the light Phoebus bestows, beauty dawns anew in preparation for the harkened awakening of his love. A beautiful romantic theme.
    I am not sure the phrase 'the king of romantic poetry' adequately fits or that this was Shakespeare's goal. Shakespeare in his plays and poetry has accurately depicted, every human emotional personality type, with unique insight. His intuitive observations and perceptive genius, invented forensic detail and analysis of character types, before the modern scientific era attained the process. (Report) Reply

  • Ramesh T A (2/8/2010 1:03:00 AM)

    What a beautiful situation! The depiction of hilarious situation, the opening eye of flower bud, etc. for waking up to enjoy life the lover begins before his lady love wakes up! Shakespeare, the king of romantic poetry is forever a joy to read! (Report) Reply

  • Hugh Dungey (2/5/2008 6:41:00 AM)

    Although most copies of Shakespeare show the poem as written, the correct version is 'evrything that pretty bin', not 'is'. Otherwise it doesn't rhyme. My Shakespeare (Collins 1958) shows 'bin'. (Report) Reply

  • Egal Bohen (11/9/2007 4:32:00 PM)

    Chaliced flowers, Golden eyes
    Language to the heavens fly
    Thank you Will.. (Report) Reply

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