Treasure Island

Lewis Carroll

(27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898 / Cheshire)

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Jabberwocky


'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
........................
........................
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Comments about this poem (Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll )

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  • * Sunprincess * (6/17/2014 10:07:00 PM)

    .............still wondering how this poem is in the top 500 poems list....and how could a great writer pen this nonsense.... (Report) Reply

  • Herbert Guitang (4/26/2014 4:29:00 AM)

    This is shocking and intense poem. It needs more understanding to get the message of the poet. Still Great (Report) Reply

  • Michelle Claus (4/17/2014 3:24:00 PM)

    Lewis Carroll's work still sways our thoughts and emotions, judging by the variety and quantity of comments. I've read this poem several times, and I still like it. I don't fully comprehend Jabberwocky, but neither do I think it is the Nonsense Poem that it is often referred to as. Carroll was a master riddler. (Report) Reply

  • Buddha Buddie (4/17/2013 2:05:00 PM)

    This poem is stupid, not funny, not creative, not anything! I hate it and I wish I had a giant dumpling so that I could throw it at this poem! I'm so mad at this poem I could suck down an Easter egg faster than a wombat eating slimy fat ugly worm! (Report) Reply

  • Adolf Hitler (4/17/2013 7:47:00 AM)

    I used to tell this one to my jews: D the good old days... Already Reported Reply

  • Adolf Hitler (4/17/2013 7:44:00 AM)

    Used to tell this one to my jews: D Already Reported Reply

  • Jinny Kim (1/21/2013 4:07:00 PM)

    When I first read this poem... I was just so shocked at the intensity of it... Even though you might have a hard time understanding it, it's still so intense! And I had to do an analysis on this poem, and I understood everything so much better and it just hit me like a wave... And I was just so shocked at how awesome it is! (Report) Reply

  • Chloe Clooless (6/24/2012 8:53:00 PM)

    i love this poem. when i was a child, my favorite teacher used to read this poem to me. this poem actually is what inspired me to write poetry (and my english teachers) . so, Bravo, Carroll! ! ! ! (Report) Reply

  • Allison Helman (4/17/2012 9:22:00 AM)

    I had French teacher in high school who wrote this poem on the board and had us together translate it into standard English line by line. His point was that even though French might appear just as incomprehensible, there are always clues i.e. where is the noun in this sentence? Does brillig have a root you might recognize in English? etc.
    While not my favorite Carroll work, it can be inferred to be about vanquishing some monster and by writing it for children in a sort of jibberish suggesting our fears are unfounded; it is not much of a monster at all much like some big people can seem. Alice herself was called a monster in Wonderland and many children get called this at some point as well but, Alice was smart enough to know she is not and later in Through The Looking- Glass she is shaking then waking. Just a soft, sweet kitten. I guess it all depends upon your personal psychological milieu. Callooh! Callay! (Report) Reply

  • Paul Brookes (4/17/2012 3:20:00 AM)

    Ahhhh back to childhood. Brilliant I still love it as much as the first time it was read to me. Just a funny poem then, now however far more reaching. I thank Mr Straw for his insights and he has given me food for thought. (Report) Reply

  • Kevin Straw (4/17/2011 11:56:00 AM)

    I did not say 'brillig' meant brilliant, I said that it was like brilliant - Carroll takes his meaning from verbal similarities in order to create a synthetic word that has no precise meaning. The fun of this poem is that tantalisingly it almost makes sense. If someone from Chaucer's time spoke to us (given that we did not know middle English) we would have the same feeling of understanding and not understanding. If people would concentrate on the poem and not try to score points off others, this site would be both more civilised and more edifying. (Report) Reply

  • Rune (5/9/2010 2:47:00 PM)

    Brillig doesn't mean brilliant, I don't know where some of you are getting your ideas.
    If you've read the novel the poem comes from, you'd have read this line:
    ''Brillig' means four o'clock in the afternoon - the time when you begin broiling things for dinner.'
    If anything, this poem is a wonderful example of using the sound and feel of words to set a tone or an atmosphere.
    Carroll was exceptionally good at inventing words that seem to have an innate meaning, a good number of his words have actually made their ways into dictionaries and everyday language ('chortle' is a good example) . (Report) Reply

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