Dante Gabriel Rossetti

(12 May 1828 – 9 April 1882 / London / England)

John Keats - Poem by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

THE weltering London ways where children weep
And girls whom none call maidens laugh,—strange road
Miring his outward steps, who inly trode
The bright Castalian brink and Latmos' steep:—
Even such his life's cross-paths; till deathly deep
He toiled through sands of Lethe; and long pain,
Weary with labour spurned and love found vain,
In dead Rome's sheltering shadow wrapped his sleep.
O pang-dowered Poet, whose reverberant lips
And heart-strung lyre awoke the Moon's eclipse,—
Thou whom the daisies glory in growing o'er,—
Their fragrance clings around thy name, not writ
But rumour'd in water, while the fame of it
Along Time's flood goes echoing evermore.


Comments about John Keats by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

  • Gold Star - 16,998 Points * Sunprincess * (3/15/2014 7:43:00 AM)

    O pang-dowered Poet, whose reverberant lips
    And heart-strung lyre awoke the Moon's eclipse, —
    Thou whom the daisies glory in growing o'er, —
    Their fragrance clings around thy name, not writ
    But rumour'd in water, while the fame of it
    Along Time's flood goes echoing evermore (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Monday, April 12, 2010



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