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Sarah Flower Adams

(1805-1848 / Essex / England)

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Love


O Love! thou makest all things even
In earth or heaven;
Finding thy way through prison-bars
........................
........................
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  • Freshman - 1,353 Points Kay Staley (12/26/2013 7:11:00 PM)

    Pretty poem that doesn't rhyme with old fashioned language. It talks about what love can conquer and how you can use love but fails to mention all the hardships involved with love. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 136 Points Rekha Mandagere (12/26/2011 10:39:00 PM)

    How nicely words are woven to presnt this wonderful contribution to mankind! Really inspiring.Rekhamandagere (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Assorted Thoughts (12/26/2011 8:13:00 PM)

    This is all over the place
    One dead end to the other without any real descriptive, heartfelt concepts.
    Perhaps, that was the shape of Sarah's heart?
    It the realm of love it works but the wording lacks interpersonal depth
    I'm afraid in this case, less isn't more
    It's unusual to see a woman describe love in such a philosophically detached manner
    Meh, maybe it's an English thing..: o) (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Michael Pruchnicki (12/26/2011 11:28:00 AM)

    On a second or third reading of the poem Love by Flower Adams and another perusal of comments by PH readers, I think most of us by and large missed the import (especially old E.S!) in the first line. The speaker addresses Love and makes the remark that in the end, when all is said and done, we mortals began as specks of dust and will in time be returned to that state The reader is admonished to look in the grave to see thine immortality! The resurrection? I don't think so. Depending on long the remains have been interred, the only trace
    of what was once a living being is a heap of bones or dust in piles.. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Rayno Adolf (12/26/2011 10:48:00 AM)

    Very creative, it can pick you up when you feeling down, more like a prayer from someone who loves you most. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 199 Points Bill Grace (12/26/2009 8:51:00 AM)

    'Thou lookest in a grave, -to see Thine immortality! ' the Resurrection in Christian theology perhaps. Bill Grace (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Kevin Straw (12/26/2009 8:04:00 AM)

    The second line is airy-fairy. The poem only makes sense if you believe in heaven, the Almighty, his plan, immortality etc etc.
    Should there not be a comma after 'things', and perhaps a colon after 'heaven'.
    Theologically, if God is Love then he is the plan, Love is not his plan.
    Also, what does she mean by 'Thou lookest in a grave, -to see
    Thine immortality! '? - That's a bit too subtle for me! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 294 Points Ramesh T A (12/26/2009 12:52:00 AM)

    It looks like an ode to love! It reminds me of Shakespeare, Milton and Keats! A tribute to love in a simple poem like this reminding about great poets makes it stand high among romantic poets here! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Rita Hawkins (12/26/2008 6:51:00 AM)

    Age? Mature? Anyone can believe in God, and write about it. Although, this is a great poem, so srah, great job.10. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Michael Pruchnicki (12/26/2008 6:14:00 AM)

    Some readers get it, some think her poem is Shakespearean, and some like Robert Browning admired her work! What her age has to do with anything is beyond me. The power of Love in her poem is not naive, clean or trusting the way a child's love for its parent might be, despite what one reader thinks. I do not believe a poet like Browning with his penchant for vivid imagery would read her poetry for its apparent artlessness, do you? That very quality in her verse bespeaks a mature talent, I believe. (Report) Reply

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