Treasure Island

Thomas Hardy

(2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928 / Dorchester / England)

Seventy-Four And Twenty


Here goes a man of seventy-four,
Who sees not what life means for him,
And here another in years a score
Who reads its very figure and trim.

The one who shall walk to-day with me
Is not the youth who gazes far,
But the breezy wight who cannot see
What Earth's ingrained conditions are.

Submitted: Saturday, April 10, 2010

Do you like this poem?
0 person liked.
0 person did not like.

What do you think this poem is about?



Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Comments about this poem (Seventy-Four And Twenty by Thomas Hardy )

Enter the verification code :

There is no comment submitted by members..

Poem of the Day

poet Rupert Brooke

If I should die, think only this of me:
That there's some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
...... Read complete »

   

Trending Poems

  1. 04 Tongues Made Of Glass, Shaun Shane
  2. Still I Rise, Maya Angelou
  3. 1914 V: The Soldier, Rupert Brooke
  4. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou
  5. Annabel Lee, Edgar Allan Poe
  6. If You Forget Me, Pablo Neruda
  7. The Road Not Taken, Robert Frost
  8. Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night, Dylan Thomas
  9. Fire and Ice, Robert Frost
  10. Invictus, William Ernest Henley

Trending Poets

[Hata Bildir]