William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet Cxiii - Poem by William Shakespeare

Since I left you, mine eye is in my mind;
And that which governs me to go about
Doth part his function and is partly blind,
Seems seeing, but effectually is out;
For it no form delivers to the heart
Of bird of flower, or shape, which it doth latch:
Of his quick objects hath the mind no part,
Nor his own vision holds what it doth catch:
For if it see the rudest or gentlest sight,
The most sweet favour or deformed'st creature,
The mountain or the sea, the day or night,
The crow or dove, it shapes them to your feature:
Incapable of more, replete with you,
My most true mind thus makes mine eye untrue.

Comments about Sonnet Cxiii by William Shakespeare

  • Fabrizio Frosini (1/6/2016 1:17:00 PM)

    this sonnet seems to be an echo of earlier sonnets (24,43,46,47) which deal with the eye/heart relationship, yet it effectively continues from the previous one and explores the theme of the totality with which the poet's soul has been invaded by the images and the presence of the beloved youth. To such an extent is he infected that the things his eye sees are no longer recorded as such, but are transmuted into the lovely features of the youth, whether they be seas, mountains, day, night, crows or doves. (Report) Reply

    9 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Brian Jani (4/26/2014 9:32:00 AM)

    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out (Report) Reply

Read all 2 comments »

Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Read poems about / on: flower, sea, night, heart, sonnet

Poem Submitted: Friday, May 18, 2001

Poem Edited: Friday, May 18, 2001

[Report Error]