Treasure Island

William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet CXXI


'Tis better to be vile than vile esteem'd,
When not to be receives reproach of being,
And the just pleasure lost which is so deem'd
Not by our feeling but by others' seeing:
For why should others false adulterate eyes
Give salutation to my sportive blood?
Or on my frailties why are frailer spies,
Which in their wills count bad what I think good?
No, I am that I am, and they that level
At my abuses reckon up their own:
I may be straight, though they themselves be bevel;
By their rank thoughts my deeds must not be shown;
Unless this general evil they maintain,
All men are bad, and in their badness reign.

Submitted: Friday, May 18, 2001
Edited: Friday, May 18, 2001

Do you like this poem?
0 person liked.
0 person did not like.

Read poems about / on: evil, lost, sonnet

Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Comments about this poem (Sonnet CXXI by William Shakespeare )

Enter the verification code :

  • Sima Murinson (4/5/2010 4:20:00 AM)

    .Sonnet CXXI can be read as the credo of the Renaissance Era, when an individual person regained the right to be the focus of Art, and together with this the right to be true to oneself. Shakespeare, in a most post-modern manner, but also adhering to the aesthetic standards of his time, defends the privilege of a human being not to be judged by others - to be loved and appreciated for what he/ she is. Shall we ever live to learn the lesson Shakespeares teaches us? (Report) Reply

Read all 2 comments »

Top Poems

  1. Phenomenal Woman
    Maya Angelou
  2. The Road Not Taken
    Robert Frost
  3. If You Forget Me
    Pablo Neruda
  4. Still I Rise
    Maya Angelou
  5. Dreams
    Langston Hughes
  6. Annabel Lee
    Edgar Allan Poe
  7. If
    Rudyard Kipling
  8. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings
    Maya Angelou
  9. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
    Robert Frost
  10. Invictus
    William Ernest Henley

New Poems

  1. Accumulation Of Essence, RoseAnn V. Shawiak
  2. When, Victor Cruickshank
  3. Growth and Change, Victor Cruickshank
  4. A Class to Remember, Victor Cruickshank
  5. Dedication, Victor Cruickshank
  6. On his greatness, Laxman Rao
  7. Frankenstein, Victor Cruickshank
  8. Potry, John deVries
  9. COPLA 84 INVOCATION: This Bad Guy World, T (no first name) Wignesan
  10. Left Behind, D.L. Aceves

Poem of the Day

poet Henry David Thoreau

My books I'd fain cast off, I cannot read,
'Twixt every page my thoughts go stray at large
Down in the meadow, where is richer feed,
And will not mind to hit their proper targe.
...... Read complete »

   
[Hata Bildir]