Treasure Island

Robert Frost

(March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963 / San Francisco)

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening


Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village, though;
He will not see me stopping here
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  • Tenn Bandit (2/27/2008 12:46:00 PM)

    I remember my sixth grade English teacher reading this poem to our class. As she read it, I remember having a calm peaceful feeling and I pictured myself actually being there with the writer observing the same beautiful snow scene. I later had an assignment during my freshman year in high school to memorize and recite a poem in front of my English class. I chose, 'Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening'. Needless to say, I got an an 'A+'. I can't describe the feeling I get when I read this poem but I can say that it is a pleasnt one and it's the very same feeling every time. The same feeling that I had the very first time that I heard it back in 1975. Thank you to My sixth grade teacher, Mrs. Guthrie for introducing me to this wonderful poem and to Robert Frost who is one of my favorite poets. (Report) Reply

  • Nomi Mas (2/11/2008 10:56:00 AM)

    deep and each of the last two lines have a meaning of their own. sublime (Report) Reply

  • Charles Wiles (Best Love Poems) (12/8/2007 5:40:00 PM)

    This poem and The Road Not Taken, were my two favorite poems at high school. Frost's incredible talent was to transport you into the world of the poem yourself... and I have sat and watched the snow falling from that horse many times. My poem 'Flakes Of Snow' is my best attempt to capture the essence of winter and I hope you enjoy it too. (Report) Reply

  • Omkar Raut (12/4/2007 1:19:00 AM)

    Hello Readers,
    I have gone through all the comments but one and unique one is that, this poem shows a great deal of enthusism in motivating all the people in knowing their responsibility. As in the sense he is telling that he has earn a lot of wealth and then now he is giving it to the neeedy ones, as it was given to him by some one, now he wants to return to the society wat he got from the society and expects other to do so before they sleep.(Die) (Report) Reply

  • Anna Russell (5/10/2007 5:09:00 PM)

    It would be pretty difficult to make a list of my Top 5 favourite poems, but if I ever did, this would be on it. The seeming simplicity of it belies the care and craft that has gone into it, and the rhythm is flawless - Forst's use of iambic tentrameter was a bold and clever move, making the poem sound like the clip-clop of horses hooves. Plus, it's got more layers than a bag of onions. They say the best in their field are the ones who make it look easy - Frost doesn't half do that here. Superb.
    Hugs
    Anna xxx (Report) Reply

  • Claudia Dee (9/13/2006 11:54:00 AM)

    This was the first Robert Frost poem I had ever read, and it's no wonder I have a continued appreciation of his work. I am no scholar, just a mom and blue collar worker, who doesn't read alot of poetry. Yet even from grade school days, this poem I have always remembered. (Report) Reply

  • Robert Howard (7/31/2006 8:42:00 AM)

    This beloved poem has been given a fine musical setting by Harvard compoer, Randall Thompson and is a respected standard in choral literature. (Report) Reply

  • Brian Dorn (7/19/2006 11:24:00 AM)

    Even with 'miles to go', Frost takes time to stop, reflect and appreciate the evening... a wonderful lesson for all. (Report) Reply

  • Poetry Hound (6/21/2006 3:51:00 PM)

    A beautiful, straightforward poem. It's very simple, yet haunting - the feeling of being alone out in the snowy woods with miles to go. I've heard this poem so many times it's hard to approach it critically because of an accompanying sense of nostalgia. That's the only reason Frost's use of rhyming works for me. I don't know that it would if I were reading this poem for the first time. (Report) Reply

  • Lamont Palmer (6/13/2006 1:51:00 PM)

    This is a wonderful poem, however, I'm more partial to his blank verse work, like 'Mending Wall'. Rhyme, even when its done exceptionally well, just grates on me a bit. (Report) Reply

  • Ashka Pandya (5/25/2006 5:23:00 PM)

    well well.. i read dis poem in my school in 7th grade i gues.. n i had 2 LBH this poem 4 my finals.. n i did pretty gud on it 2.. i have learned many poems.. but dis poem is the only poem that i still remeber.. specially the last 4 lines.. it juz so cool (Report) Reply

  • Joe Breunig (5/6/2006 11:01:00 PM)

    As a young school boy, this is the first poem I read in grammar school; had to memorize part of it for an english class. Being from New England (Maine) , I can easily relate to the wintry imagery. (Report) Reply

  • William D (3/30/2005 9:17:00 AM)

    The epitome of a perfect poem. Frost was truly summoning some divine inspiration here. (Report) Reply

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