Robert Frost

(March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963 / San Francisco)

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening


Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village, though;
He will not see me stopping here
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  • Dikshita Saikia (9/12/2012 2:40:00 AM)

    I love this poem very much. I have it in my English textbook. This poem is so lively, so heart-touching. I have never seen snow till now but I can just feel its softness, chilliness, see the darkness of the woods and hear the harness bells. Also I love the last lines which state that the poet has responsibilities to complete before his death. (Report) Reply

  • Richard Barrowclough (8/25/2012 2:18:00 PM)

    i think the woods represent the 'soul or 'spirit'. something we know is there but we are always distracted from. for a brief moment the rider comes into contact with that 'soul' or 'spirit' but he is jolted back into mundane reality by the jangling of his horses harness. the most amazing thing about this poem is how you almost feel the cold and hear the snowflakes settling in the woods. beautiful. (Report) Reply

  • Rajnish Manga (8/24/2012 2:12:00 AM)

    The poem is a testimony of the poet's love for nature and life. Inspite of surrounded by an atmosphere with all its temptations, the poet is driven more by his commitments and duty than anything else. Great poem, very inspiring. I came to know about this poem when Pt. Nehru died in May 1964. The last four lines of the poem written by Nehru on a piece of paper were found on his table which were quoted by Newspapers. (Report) Reply

  • Elsie Louis (8/13/2012 9:41:00 AM)

    I love the imagery in this poem. When I read it, I can just feel the stillness, hear the harness bells and the sweep of the wind on the snow. And of course the last few lines add just the right hint of mystery... (Report) Reply

  • Elizabeth Padillo Olesen (8/11/2012 8:18:00 AM)

    My love for poetry started by reciting verses by heart and one of those known verses I had mastered was this last line of Robert Frost and used it as my excuse or weapon in deciding on my priorities. This is a very simple text, manageable to understand and follow. So good to read this poem appearing at poemhunter.com. Thanks. (Report) Reply

  • Poet Dragon (8/7/2012 12:52:00 PM)

    I love how this poem shows us how the Santa Clause myth has changed with the christmas marketing of stores and toymakers. Where once he had a single horse he now has a crew of reindeer. This is clearly Saint Nicholas...for who else would have the knowledge of whose woods these are-and where his home is- and be about on the darkest night of the year? Merry Christmas! (Report) Reply

  • Tristan King (8/5/2012 3:48:00 PM)

    This poem mean so much to me, I put a copy of it behind my father's picture after he died. I agree that at the end Frost is referring to present and future comittments and promises that he must keep before he reaches his eternal rest.. A truly beautiful poem filled with imagery and heartfelt promise. (Report) Reply

  • Tech Consult (7/21/2012 4:58:00 PM)

    i agree with you BW....further would like to add....the second last line And miles to go before I sleep indicates that it is already night and time for him to sleep....further the last line....repeated And miles to go before I sleep expresses his commitments which he needs to complete before he dies.... (Report) Reply

  • B W (7/16/2012 11:00:00 PM)

    Have to completely disagree with you, Boone. The rider is taking a moment, stopping his normal schedule (the horse isn't used to him stopping here) to take in the woods and the lake as the snow falls gently around him. You can almost feel the rider breathe in slowly, take in the surroundings, then realize that he can't enjoy the moment forever...he has commitments (life) that must be met. It is time to move on and continue on his journey through time.

    Just my opinion of course, and you're entitled to yours. I just don't see all the gloom that you see in it. (Report) Reply

  • Hello Boone (7/5/2012 1:56:00 PM)

    There is no beauty or optimism in this poem, only gloom. The poem is best summed up in this way:

    For the working man in society, life sucks and then you die.

    “Hey, you there! Yes, you, dallying by my woods! Don't you have somewhere to be? I suppose your employer enjoys throwing his hard earned money away so you can sit out here in the cold gawking at trees?

    “Oh, forgive me. Are you sad about something? Having some personal hardship, are you? Are you feeling sorry for yourself? Well, boo-hoo and too bad for you! Now stop this foolishness and get on with it! There is work to be done, and it is not going to get done with you lagging here.

    “Oh, and let me tell you this, you loitering fool. You can just dropp these fantastic ideas you have about running off to live a natural life or thinking about the life you should have lived. Put away this nonsense about living for yourself, free and easy in the wilderness like a savage. Those days are gone. And they're gone for you, too. No doubt, you have a family and probably plenty of debt, by the looks of you. So get on with it.

    “Oh, someday, you'll get to die, yes, but that's a long way off. So get back to work.” (Report) Reply

  • Mark Dillon (7/2/2012 2:14:00 AM)

    one of my favs, so quiet, you can almost feel the flakes falling in the stillness, love it. (Report) Reply

  • Megan Cruz (5/24/2012 12:45:00 PM)

    A suicide interrupted. And miles to go before I sleep, and miles to go before I sleep. (Report) Reply

  • Aloke Mukherjee (5/15/2012 11:57:00 AM)

    A very good poem. We can see the master artist, with a few strokes, evoking an eerie atmosphere to fit in the conclusive stanza. (Report) Reply

  • Veeraiyah Subbulakshmi (5/10/2012 3:48:00 AM)

    How many miles have I traveled in the woods,
    Where I collect the memories to upkeep,
    Traveling with a suit case makes me a nomad,
    What God wills for me really shrouds with clouds. (Report) Reply

  • Walterrean Salley (4/29/2012 12:42:00 AM)

    Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening is among my favorites. I memorized it, when much younger. This poem never fails to give me such a warm feeling of nostalgia. I’m very glad that it was written. (Report) Reply

  • Joe Breunig (3/6/2012 11:41:00 AM)

    This is one of my favorite poems written by R.F.; had to memorize the last stanza for an English project in elementary school!

    -Joe Breunig
    Reaching Towards His Unbounded Glory (Report) Reply

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