Robert Frost

(March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963 / San Francisco)

Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening - Poem by Robert Frost

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village, though;
He will not see me stopping here
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Comments about Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

  • Rookie Richard Barrowclough (12/21/2012 6:10:00 PM)

    great, simple, simply great. (Report) Reply

    34 person liked.
    29 person did not like.
  • Rookie Parul Rastogi (12/2/2012 11:05:00 AM)

    Every time when I read these lines, a new idea of life strikes my mind. How beautifully Frost depicted a great lesson in these simple words! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Salman Yusafzai (11/9/2012 4:25:00 AM)

    First read it in Grade 8. Its such a easy read, simple & yet so enchanting. Great poets make it look easy. Brings the whole picture to one's mind. Whether its about death or NOT...that is debatable! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Veronica Bennie (10/18/2012 4:12:00 PM)

    Oh, I nearly forgot. I was reading this mermaid book called Lies Beneath and found a poem inside it. I wanted to see if there was a longer version of it, but I can't because it was written anonomously. Can someone help me find it? It goes like this:

    Mother, may I go out to swim?
    Yes, my darling daughter.
    Fold your clothes up neat and trim.
    But don't go near the water.

    At first I laughed at it, because it was impossible to swim without water, but then I realized; Mermaid book! Duh! And I think it may be a warning from the mother to the daughter that danger, such as mermaids, lives in the water, so you shouldn't go near it. What do you guys think? (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Veronica Bennie (10/18/2012 4:08:00 PM)

    I really don't like how some poems talk about Death like that, but this is a beautiful peom. Or maybe that's just me being depressed about something. Well, I couldn't get a deeper meaning besides the one below, so that's the one I'm sticking with. If you come up with anything else that makes sense, tell me so I can check it out. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Veronica Bennie (10/16/2012 5:13:00 PM)

    I think this poem has a deeper meaning about Death. The 'The woods are lovely, dark, and deep' could symbolize Heaven or Hell. They appear lovely, dark, and deep and a great place to go. 'But I have promises to keep' could mean that something keeps him on Earth. Something important to him. 'And miles to go before I sleep. And miles to go before I sleep' could mean that he has a long way to go before he can die. Some people say that dieing is like going to sleep. Miles is a long way. So it could mean that the person in this wants to die, but something important happened or is happening so he can't 'leave' yet. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Shivani Misra (10/15/2012 10:17:00 PM)

    Awesome awesome. Learnt it in tenth grade. Loved it then n love it still. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 1 Points Monoj Panday (10/12/2012 9:08:00 AM)

    I love this poem....... i've read reapitdly (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 20 Points Akanksha Bhatt (10/1/2012 10:14:00 AM)

    i love this poem! The Road Not Taken and Stopping By Wood On A Snowy Evening are the two which has inspired me for my 1st poem! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Adele Malik (9/25/2012 5:22:00 AM)

    i've always loved Robert for what he writes and expresses through his magical words. Miles to go before i sleep these last lines are very touchy: ') and yeah! to be mentioned, i recited this poem in my 3rd standarad which won me the 1st prize :) it was my dad who chose this poem for me, and that maybe 1 of the reason this poem is so close to me :) (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 285 Points John S (9/19/2012 12:32:00 PM)

    Well, I disagree I don't think it's a particularly moving poem, at least compared to many of the great poems that exist like Poe's A dream within a dream. I do give him credit that every line is exactly 8 syllables. That takes talent to be able to create a good poem with 16 lines that are all 8 syllables each. You have a to be very selective with your words and have a good command of the English language to be able to do that, and still create a good poem. As hard as I try I can never manage to make all of my verses are the exact same amount of syllables, it is a very hard thing to do. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 22 Points Jennifer Waters (9/12/2012 2:40:00 AM)

    I love this poem very much. I have it in my English textbook. This poem is so lively, so heart-touching. I have never seen snow till now but I can just feel its softness, chilliness, see the darkness of the woods and hear the harness bells. Also I love the last lines which state that the poet has responsibilities to complete before his death. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Richard Barrowclough (8/25/2012 2:18:00 PM)

    i think the woods represent the 'soul or 'spirit'. something we know is there but we are always distracted from. for a brief moment the rider comes into contact with that 'soul' or 'spirit' but he is jolted back into mundane reality by the jangling of his horses harness. the most amazing thing about this poem is how you almost feel the cold and hear the snowflakes settling in the woods. beautiful. (Report) Reply

  • Gold Star - 24,529 Points Rajnish Manga (8/24/2012 2:12:00 AM)

    The poem is a testimony of the poet's love for nature and life. Inspite of surrounded by an atmosphere with all its temptations, the poet is driven more by his commitments and duty than anything else. Great poem, very inspiring. I came to know about this poem when Pt. Nehru died in May 1964. The last four lines of the poem written by Nehru on a piece of paper were found on his table which were quoted by Newspapers. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Elsie Louis (8/13/2012 9:41:00 AM)

    I love the imagery in this poem. When I read it, I can just feel the stillness, hear the harness bells and the sweep of the wind on the snow. And of course the last few lines add just the right hint of mystery... (Report) Reply

  • Gold Star - 4,543 Points Elizabeth Padillo Olesen (8/11/2012 8:18:00 AM)

    My love for poetry started by reciting verses by heart and one of those known verses I had mastered was this last line of Robert Frost and used it as my excuse or weapon in deciding on my priorities. This is a very simple text, manageable to understand and follow. So good to read this poem appearing at Thanks. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 73 Points Poet Dragon (8/7/2012 12:52:00 PM)

    I love how this poem shows us how the Santa Clause myth has changed with the christmas marketing of stores and toymakers. Where once he had a single horse he now has a crew of reindeer. This is clearly Saint Nicholas...for who else would have the knowledge of whose woods these are-and where his home is- and be about on the darkest night of the year? Merry Christmas! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Tristan King (8/5/2012 3:48:00 PM)

    This poem mean so much to me, I put a copy of it behind my father's picture after he died. I agree that at the end Frost is referring to present and future comittments and promises that he must keep before he reaches his eternal rest.. A truly beautiful poem filled with imagery and heartfelt promise. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Tech Consult (7/21/2012 4:58:00 PM)

    i agree with you BW....further would like to add....the second last line And miles to go before I sleep indicates that it is already night and time for him to sleep....further the last line....repeated And miles to go before I sleep expresses his commitments which he needs to complete before he dies.... (Report) Reply

  • Rookie B W (7/16/2012 11:00:00 PM)

    Have to completely disagree with you, Boone. The rider is taking a moment, stopping his normal schedule (the horse isn't used to him stopping here) to take in the woods and the lake as the snow falls gently around him. You can almost feel the rider breathe in slowly, take in the surroundings, then realize that he can't enjoy the moment forever...he has commitments (life) that must be met. It is time to move on and continue on his journey through time.

    Just my opinion of course, and you're entitled to yours. I just don't see all the gloom that you see in it. (Report) Reply

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