Oscar Wilde

(1854-1900 / Dublin / Ireland)

The Ballad Of Reading Gaol - Poem by Oscar Wilde

He did not wear his scarlet coat,
For blood and wine are red,
And blood and wine were on his hands
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Form: Ballad


Comments about The Ballad Of Reading Gaol by Oscar Wilde

  • Veteran Poet - 1,054 Points Michelle Claus (1/27/2015 9:55:00 PM)

    The musicality of this composition carried my reading of it through to the end. I enjoyed it, both for its high-caliber writing quality and its narrative. I'll remember this poem. (Report) Reply

    2 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Veteran Poet - 1,054 Points Michelle Claus (1/27/2015 9:54:00 PM)

    The musicality of this composition carried my reading of it through to the end. I enjoyed it, both for its high-caliber writing quality and its narrative. I'll remember this poem. (Report) Reply

  • Bronze Star - 2,452 Points Godfrey Morris (1/27/2015 8:33:00 PM)

    This was powerfully written at least the part that I read. Hopefully I will read the entire thing one day. Thanks Oscar Wilde r.I.p (Report) Reply

  • Silver Star - 3,652 Points John Richter (1/27/2015 7:40:00 AM)

    Painfully long ballad. Someday I'll finish it for surely it is absolutely masterful - (that which I could get through today) (Report) Reply

  • Silver Star - 3,899 Points Pranab K Chakraborty (1/27/2015 6:30:00 AM)

    Waits for the holy hands that took
    The Thief to Paradise;
    And a broken and a contrite heart
    The Lord will not despise.

    Long yet to observe, long yet to read, long to suffer yet....... (Report) Reply

  • Rookie William Crowe (1/9/2010 10:43:00 PM)

    They jailed a poet for two years, but he painted them on the canvas of eternity (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 9 Points Herman Chiu (10/15/2009 9:19:00 PM)

    Wow! ! !
    This is great!
    We all 'kill the thing we love', but perhaps we should do it with a sword.
    He is, simply, right. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points Gillian.E. Shaw (3/4/2005 2:06:00 PM)

    I really enjoy this poem by Oscar Wilde whose aesthetic form demonstrates poetic perfection. I adore the final verse. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Rayanne T (11/24/2004 8:15:00 PM)

    This has much to do with the death sentence but then it also touches on the other parts. Self evaluation is something we all go through and will continue to do for the rest of our lives. Realized or not. I believe his view is shared by many. Housewives, tramps, business men, thieves, players, etc. Every person who holds a title will wonder one day. They will wonder about there lives and wonder about there fates. They will wonder in first, second, and third person. It touches on more then just the overall issue. It touches on something that haunts each of us everyday. No one is innocent, unless a child who lays in somber. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie John McPartlan (6/10/2004 10:24:00 PM)

    Mr. Wilde confronts us squarely with the horror of the death sentence. The death sentence remains a conundrum for many. An eye for an eye; you pay the price for your crime. The concept of revenge lurks in the heart of man. We can clothe it in the attire of justice, vengeance, honour. We cannot escape its horror. There is no dignity in the execution of execution. The awful currency of today, 'closure, ' is often perceived as a benediction of legitimate revenge. He got his due; we can move on; this brings a 'closure' to the matter. Justice is our form of revenge. (Report) Reply








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