Alfred Edward Housman

(26 March 1859 – 30 April 1936 / Worcestershire)

The Carpenter's Son - Poem by Alfred Edward Housman

"Here the hangman stops his cart:
Now the best of friends must part.
Fare you well, for ill fare I:
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Comments about The Carpenter's Son by Alfred Edward Housman

  • Veteran Poet - 1,591 Points George Samuel (9/26/2014 8:27:00 PM)

    Fare you well, for ill fare I:
    In anguish we try to forget the things we love when they live not finding a suitable way to say goodbye.
    Nice poem. (Report) Reply

    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Veteran Poet - 1,428 Points Sagnik Chakraborty (9/26/2014 2:18:00 PM)

    Beautiful allusion of the crucifixion of Christ through a secular everyday shroud. (Report) Reply

  • Gold Star - 45,481 Points Gangadharan Nair Pulingat (7/6/2014 2:52:00 AM)

    A wonderful poem in its nice creativity. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Carolina Jamies (9/26/2013 7:11:00 PM)

    nice poem but i suggest member poems should be used as poem of the day and not dead poets.thanks (Report) Reply

  • Freshman - 867 Points Liliana ~el (9/26/2013 4:11:00 PM)

    Revolutionary martyr. (Report) Reply

  • Silver Star - 3,224 Points Babatunde Aremu (9/26/2013 4:04:00 AM)

    Biblical allusion at its best. A wonderful way of relating the experience of Jsus Christ on the Cross. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Kevin Straw (9/26/2012 12:15:00 PM)

    This seems to be a secular version of the Crucifixion. It is not saying pick up your Cross and follow me, but keep your noses clean and you will not end up on a cross! (Report) Reply

  • Gold Star - 6,116 Points Pranab K Chakraborty (9/26/2011 10:18:00 PM)

    ... at home had I but stayed

    Much to stop here for further move. The tune is yet for our own perhaps... (Report) Reply

  • Freshman - 828 Points Juan Olivarez (9/26/2011 12:02:00 PM)

    I think all of you have missed the point. This is a story of Jesus cruxifiction. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Mishack Mchunu (9/26/2011 5:02:00 AM)

    'Here hang I, and right and left
    Two poor fellows hang for theft:
    All the same's the luck we prove,
    Though the midmost hangs for love.' M so in love with this poem, thank you! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Mishack Mchunu (9/26/2011 5:01:00 AM)

    'Here hang I, and right and left
    Two poor fellows hang for theft:
    All the same's the luck we prove,
    Though the midmost hangs for love.' M so in love with this poem, thank you! (Report) Reply

  • Gold Star - 15,816 Points Ramesh T A (9/26/2010 7:53:00 AM)

    Serious matter has been made into comic matter in this poem which is quite meaningful and interesting to read! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Rishi Menon (9/26/2009 9:55:00 PM)

    One word: JESUS.
    Only a true poet can make simple statements with such synaptics.
    Lesser endowed like me write straight ones like The Star of Bethlehem. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points saltedpeanut blank (9/26/2009 5:22:00 PM)

    The love Housman was referring to was obviously Jesus Christ's love for the people and he was condemned for the works and miracles he performed when the high priests recognized it as, what to them, was an attempt to throw them out of power. The rest most people know the story Jesus was hung with two common thieves, one on his left and another on the right. The number 3 is also an important biblical reference of the holy trinity. This poem has overwhelming religious undertones. I can imagine Housman as either a pious man or a boozing, lecherous, sinner who sought atonement in his works. For that answer I will have to read his bio! :) (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points Michael Harmon (9/26/2009 2:31:00 PM)

    Besides the obviousness of the title, the following quatrain seems to me to be an unequivocal allusion (and therefore religious reference) to the crucifixion of Christ:

    'Here hang I, and right and left
    Two poor fellows hang for theft:
    All the same's the luck we prove,
    Though the midmost hangs for love. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Guybrush Threepwood (9/26/2009 9:21:00 AM)

    S'pose, you can't know exactly what he died for. But it is a cool poem-sort of feels like a drinking song to me, only instead of swinging a beer stein somebody is actually swinging. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 192 Points Joseph Poewhit (9/26/2009 5:46:00 AM)

    Interesting poem. Saying, best to stay in your own backyard. YET, bringing JESUS, a carpenter, into the picture. JESUS, went forth and built a house of teachings by his word. Further, sent by the Father, for this purpose. If JESUS, stayed in his backyard, his Fathers house of teaching would not have been built. Again, interesting poem. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Kevin Straw (9/26/2009 5:42:00 AM)

    A secularist take on the crucifixion of Christ. Tightly written with the inspired rhyme of adze and lads. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Robert Quilter (9/26/2008 2:53:00 PM)

    I think i need a new word, for poems that i can say i didn't exactly enjoy (feel good) but that i certainly appreciated e.g.what we have here.Indeed a cautionary tale, this poor fellow finds himself dangling between two thieves and his crime?
    Love and he did not leave ill alone! Nicely constructed, little heavy handed but then the guys about to be hanged, so who can blame him? and an adze is apparantly a carpenters tool. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Kentucky Refugee (9/26/2007 1:49:00 PM)

    Adze is a woodworking tool.

    I like the poem. Is it possible to be condemned for a true love today? (Report) Reply

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