Rabindranath Tagore

(7 May 1861 – 7 August 1941 / Calcutta (Kolkata), Bengal Presidency / British India)

Unyielding - Poem by Rabindranath Tagore

When I called you in your garden
Mango blooms were rich in fragrance -
Why did you remain so distant,
Keep your doors so tightly fastened?
Blossoms grew to ripe fruit-clusters -
Your rejected my cuppded handfuls,
Closed your eyes to perfectness.

In the fierce harsh storms of Baisakh,
Golden ripened fruit fell tumbling.
'Dust, I said, 'defiles such offerings:
Let your hands be heaven to them.'
Still you showed no friendliness.

Lampless were your doors at evening,
Pitch-black as I played my vina.
How the starlight twanged my heartstrings!
How I set my vina dancing!
You showed no responsiveness.

Sad birds twittered sleeplessly,
Calling, calling lost companions.
Gone the right time for our union -
Low the moon while still you brooded,
Sunk in lonely pensiveness.

Who can understand another!
Heart cannot restrain its passion.
I had hoped that some remaining
Tear-soaked memories would sway you,
Stir your feet to lightsomeness.

Moon fell at the feet of morning,
Loosened from the night's fading necklace.
While you slept, O did my Vina
Lull you with its heartache? Did you
Dream at least of happiness?


Comments about Unyielding by Rabindranath Tagore

  • Gold Star - 4,884 Points Rajesh Thankappan (1/31/2015 8:49:00 AM)

    Happiness is a treasure which we should accept with both hands. (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Monday, March 29, 2010



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