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Mike Fitzgibbons And His Morning Paper - Poem by Donal Mahoney

For 35 years, Mike Fitzgibbons had never missed a day driving off at 4 a.m. to buy the newspaper at his local convenience store. Snow, sleet, hail or rain couldn't stop him. There was only one paper being published in St. Louis at the time but Mike was addicted to newspapers. He had spent his early years reading four papers a day in Chicago- two in the morning and two in the evening. He worked for one of them and enjoyed every minute of it. However, an opportunity to earn more money as an editor for a defense contractor required his large family's relocation to St. Louis. Mike needed more money to feed a wife and seven children.

'Words are words, ' Mike said at the time. 'Being paid more money to arrange words for someone else seems like the right thing to do.'

Writing and editing were the two things in life Mike could do well enough to draw a salary. It broke his heart to retire many years later at the age of 68 but it seemed like the best thing to do. His doctor had told him he might have early Alzheimer's disease and that he should prepare for the future since the disease would only grow worse. Mike never told his wife or any of the children about the problem. His wife was the excitable type, and all of the children had grown up and moved away, many of them back to Chicago where all of them had been born. Each of them had acquired a college degree or two and had found a good job. Most of them were married. Mike and his wife now had 12 grandchildren and were looking forward to more.

'You can never have too many heirs, ' he told his wife one time. 'Whatever we leave, it will give them something to argue about after we're gone. They won't forget us.'

After the doctor had mentioned the strong possibility that he had Alzheimer's disease, Mike decided to have the daily paper delivered to the house instead of driving to the store every morning to buy one. And on most days that seemed like a good decision. But not on the infrequent days when the deliveryman soared by Mike's house without tossing a paper on the lawn.

The first time it happened Mike called the circulation department and received a credit on his bill. He did the same thing the second time, managing to keep his temper under control. But the third time occurred on the morning after the Super Bowl. For Mike this was the last straw. Three times he told the kind old lady in the circulation department to tell the driver Mike was from Chicago originally and in that fine city errors of this magnitude did not go unanswered. A credit on Mike's bill, while necessary, would not suffice.

When his wife Dolly got up, he asked her, 'How the hell can I check the stats on the game without my newspaper? ' She was only half awake. Mike was a very early riser and Dolly, according to Mike, was a 'sack hound.'

A kind woman, Dolly had always tried to be helpful throughout the many years of their marriage, so Mike understood why she eventually suggested he drive to the QuikTrip and buy a paper. Then he could read about the game and check the stats, she said.

'That's not the point, Dolly, ' Mike said. 'I have a verbal contract with that paper for delivery and they are not keeping their side of the bargain. A credit on my bill is not adequate recompense.' Mike loved the sound of that last sentence as it rolled off his tongue. He always loved the sound of words whether they were floating in the air alone or jailed in a sentence or paragraph.

What made matters worse, Mike told Dolly, is that without his newspaper he would have no way to check on the obituaries of the day. The obituaries were Mike's favorite part of the paper. Back in his old ethnic neighborhood in Chicago, the obituaries were known as the Irishman's Racing Form.

Back then, many retired Irish immigrants would spend the day reviewing the obituaries in the city's four different newspapers. Finding a good obituary primed them for conversation at the local tap after supper. The tap was run by the legendary Rosie McCarthy, a humongous widow who did not suffer any nonsense in her establishment. But she did offer free hard-boiled eggs to customers who ordered at least three foaming steins of Guinness. Eggs were cheap in those days. It was rumored that Rosie had to buy 10 dozen eggs a week just to keep her customers happy.

'Rosie knows how to hard boil an egg, Dolly, ' Mike had told his wife many times over the years. And his wife always wondered what secret Rosie could possibly have when it came to boiling eggs.

One reason the obituaries were of such great interest in Mike's old neighborhood involved the retirees wanting to see if any of their old bosses had finally died. Some of those bosses had been nasty men, so petulant and abrasive they'd have given even a good worker a rash. There was also the possibility that over in Ireland, the Irish Republican Army might finally blow up a bridge with the Queen of England on it. The IRA had been trying to do that for years. Many bridges had been blown to smithereens but not one of them had 'Herself' on it.

'The IRA keeps blowing up bridges, Dolly, ' Mike would remind his wife. 'You would think one of these times they'd get it right. They know what she looks like.'

In addition to reading four newspapers a day as a young man, Mike had had other hobbies during his long and tumultuous life. He had bred rare Australian finches for decades and had won prizes with them at bird shows. However, after his last son had graduated from college and moved away, Mike sold more than 200 finches and 40 cages because he no longer had a son available to clean the cages. Five sons had earned allowances over the years cleaning the cages at least once a week. All of them ended up hating anything with wings. One son had even bought a BB gun and would sit out in the yard all day while Mike was at work. That boy was a pretty good shot. No one knows how many woodpeckers and chickadees he managed to pick off.

After Mike sold his birds, he took the considerable proceeds and plowed all of the money into rare coins. For the next ten years he collected many rare coins but when he retired he figured he may as well sell them because none of his children had any numismatic interest. Not only that, none of them would have known the value of the coins if Mike died. Some of them were very valuable- the 1943 Irish Florin, for example, in Extra Fine condition would have brought more than $15,000 at the right auction. Mike loved that coin and kept it, along with all the others, in a large safe in the basement. Guarding the safe was a large if somewhat addled and ancient bloodhound. Mike had bought the dog from a fellow bird breeder when it was a pup. The bloodhound wasn't toothless but he may as well have been. He wouldn't bite anyone no matter how menacing a robber might be.

'I love that dog, Dolly, ' Mike would tell his wife every time she suggested that euthanasia might be the best thing.

'That dog, Dolly, is as Catholic as we are and Catholics don't abort or euthanize anything, ' Mike said.

When Mike finally sold all of his coins, he had a great deal of money that he viewed as disposable income. Dolly, however, viewed it as an insurance policy in case Mike died first. Mike had a couple of pensions but he had never made Dolly a co-beneficiary. In fact he convinced her to sign waivers so the payout to him would be larger. Dolly didn't want to do it but signing was easier than reasoning with Mike. His temper seldom surfaced but when it did, things weren't good for weeks around the house.

'I get mad once in awhile, Dolly, but I always apologize, ' Mike would remind her.

Mike finally decided to put the coin money into guns- big guns- although he had never shot a gun in his life. He refused to go hunting because he saw no sense in killing animals when meat was available at the butcher store. The kids used to joke that maybe deer and pheasant were Catholic, too.

Some of the guns Mike bought were the kind you would see in action movies. Mike always liked action movies. The more the gore, the happier Mike was. But he had to go to action movies alone because his wife hated gore but she liked musicals. No musicals for Mike, although he would always dig into his pocket to give her the money for admission, complaining occasionally that the cost of seeing musicals kept going up.

'I don't want to spend good money to see a bunch of people in costumes and wigs singing songs together when Frank Sinatra, all by himself, sings better than any of them.' Sinatra had a good voice, the kids thought, and it probably didn't hurt that he was Catholic. One of them once suggested to Mike that it might be nice if they played a recording of Sinatra's 'Moonlight in Vermont' at church. Mike didn't agree or disagree because he thought some sacrilege might be involved.

Mike remembered his gun collection on the day the deliveryman had failed to throw his newspaper on the lawn. He decided that the next morning he would sit out on his front porch at 3 a.m. with a big mug of coffee and the biggest rifle he owned. When the delivery van drove down his street, he planned to walk out to the curb, rifle in hand, to make sure he got his paper and to advise the driver of the inconvenience his mistake of the previous day had caused.

'There's no way this guy's a Catholic, ' Mike said to himself. 'Three times now he has skipped my house with my paper.'

The next morning things went exactly as planned- at the start. Mike was out on his porch with his rifle and coffee at 3 a.m. when the van came rolling down the street. Mike got up and strolled down the walk toward the van, his rifle resting like a child in his arms. Mike couldn't have known, however, that the van driver had been robbed several times over the years and that he carried a pistol in case someone decide to rob him again. When he saw Mike coming toward him down the middle of the street carrying a rifle, the driver decided to take no chances. He rolled down the window and put a bullet in Mike's forehead.

One shot, dead center, was all it took, and Mike, still a big strapping man, fell like a tree.

The next day the story about the death of Mike Fitzgibbons made the front page of his beloved paper and Mike himself was listed in the obituary section. The obit advised that friends of the family could come to the wake at Eagan's Funeral Home on
Friday. It also pointed out that a Solemn High Funeral Mass would be said for Mike on Saturday at St. Aloysius Church, where Mike had been a faithful member and stalwart usher for decades.

Two days after the funeral, a neighbor was shoveling snow for Mike's widow. He happened to look up and saw the missing newspaper stuck in the branch of one of Mike's Weeping Willow trees. Mike had an interest in Weeping Willows and had planted a number of them over the years, too many some of the neighbors thought for the size of his property. This was the first time a newspaper had gotten stuck in one of the trees, his wife said. And it would be the last time because she had canceled the subscription to the paper the day Mike died. Like her husband, Dolly was a woman of principle and she thought canceling the paper was the least she could do in his memory. She had never read the damn thing anyway.


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Poems About Funeral

  1. 1. Mike Fitzgibbons And His Morning Paper , Donal Mahoney
  2. 2. Snow And Tears! , Edward Kofi Louis
  3. 3. Sorrow's Canyons , RoseAnn V. Shawiak
  4. 4. Two Funerals In One Day , Donal Mahoney
  5. 5. Coming Home At Midnight To The Farm , Donal Mahoney
  6. 6. Interment , oskar hansen
  7. 7. Freedom Of The Flame , Jim Milks
  8. 8. ! D E A T H , Michael Shepherd
  9. 9. Life And Death At St. Pancratius , Donal Mahoney
  10. 10. Gratitude For Future , Rm.Shanmugam Chettiar.
  11. 11. At Our Funeral , Bob Gotti
  12. 12. Phobia , Patti Masterman
  13. 13. Rural Princess , Donal Mahoney
  14. 14. Armies Of Ghosts , Naveed Akram
  15. 15. Funerals , Naveed Akram
  16. 16. Living In Death And Death Lives In Me , MOHAMMAD SKATI
  17. 17. We Are , MOHAMMAD SKATI
  18. 18. Mcgillicuddy's Wake , Donal Mahoney
  19. 19. Finally Hope Fades Away , MOHAMMAD SKATI
  20. 20. Arms And The Dress , gershon hepner
  21. 21. From Creation To Extravagance , Naveed Akram
  22. 22. The Little Black Cormorant , Clarence Michael James Stani ..
  23. 23. The Grand Funeral , Rm.Shanmugam Chettiar.
  24. 24. ***with Whom And Why (Post Post Modern P.. , Sadiqullah Khan
  25. 25. No Posthumous Gratitude , Rm.Shanmugam Chettiar.
  26. 26. Blessing , RIC S. BASTASA
  27. 27. A Vision Of A Future Life , Francis Duggan
  28. 28. A Death In The Opposite House! , nimal dunuhinga
  29. 29. Not There To Indict , Rm.Shanmugam Chettiar.
  30. 30. The Mother Sparrow Grieves Upon The Unti.. , RIC S. BASTASA
  31. 31. The Voyeuristic , Rm.Shanmugam Chettiar.
  32. 32. No Feedback , Rm.Shanmugam Chettiar.
  33. 33. An Agonised Prayer , Satish Verma
  34. 34. At The Funeral Of Sean Fay , Francis Duggan
  35. 35. Poets Set Their Hearts On Fire , Patti Masterman
  36. 36. That Funeral Procession , Aldo Kraas
  37. 37. A Junkie’s Mother Goes Walking Into Dark.. , sheena blackhall
  38. 38. Final Conspiracy , James B. Earley
  39. 39. The Voice In The Upstairs Room , David Lewis Paget
  40. 40. Mourning Thoughts , RoseAnn V. Shawiak
  41. 41. The Prescient Vest , David Lewis Paget
  42. 42. Doomed Padre , oskar hansen
  43. 43. Love Unrequested , oskar hansen
  44. 44. On The Astrologers (From The Greek) , William Cowper
  45. 45. Shards Of Memories , RoseAnn V. Shawiak
  46. 46. All Our Days Are Pretty And Lovely , MOHAMMAD SKATI
  47. 47. Funeral , Nassy Fesharaki
  48. 48. Around Here. , Dónall Dempsey
  49. 49. There Must Be More To Us , Francis Duggan
  50. 50. Little Boy Lost , Joe Rosochacki
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