Quotations About / On: AMERICA

  • 41.
    America how can I write a holy litany in your silly mood?
    (Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926), U.S. poet. America (l. 55). . . Allen Ginsberg: Collected Poems 1947-1980 (1984) Harper and Row.)
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  • 42.
    That great America on the other side of the sphere, Australia.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Moby-Dick (1851), ch. 24, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 6, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1988).)
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  • 43.
    America is a vast conspiracy to make you happy.
    (John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Problems, "How to Love America and Leave it at the Same Time," (1980).)
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  • 44.
    In America the President reigns for four years, and Journalism governs for ever and ever.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Complete Works of Oscar Wilde, ed. J.B. Foreman (1966). The Soul of Man Under Socialism (1895) Fortnightly Review (London, Feb. 1891).)
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  • 45.
    In America and Europe the nomadism is of trade and curiosity.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "History," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, america
  • 46.
    In going to America one learns that poverty is not a necessary accompaniment to civilisation.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lecture, July 10, 1883. "Personal Impressions of America.")
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  • 47.
    There are hardly five critics in America; and several of them are asleep.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "Hawthorne and His Mosses" (1850), The Piazza Tales and Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 9, eds. Harrison Hayford, Alma A. MacDougall, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1987).)
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  • 48.
    America is not civil, whilst Africa is barbarous.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Address Delivered in Concord on the Anniversary of the Emancipation of the Negroes in the British West Indies, August 1, 1844," Miscellanies (1883, repr. 1903). Edward Emerson notes that "Boston Hymn" sings a similar sentiment. Emerson is not commenting on the nature of African civilization, but noting the barbarity of the slave trade on its shores.)
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  • 49.
    We have really everything in common with America nowadays, except, of course, language.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Complete Works of Oscar Wilde, ed. J.B. Foreman (1966). The Canterville Ghost, ch. 1, Court and Society Review (London, Feb. 23 and March 2, 1887). The words, or similar ones, have often been attributed to George Bernard Shaw, though they are not to be found in Shaw's published writings. Bertrand Russell made a similar point in Saturday Evening Post, June 3, 1944: "It is a misfortune for Anglo- American friendship that the two countries are supposed to have a common language.")
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  • 50.
    You must not judge people by their country. In South America, it is always wise to judge people by their altitude.
    (Paul Theroux (b. 1941), U.S. novelist, travel writer. Quoting an old lady's advice, in The Old Patagonian Express (1979).)
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