Quotations About / On: ANGEL

  • 31.
    Anyone who seeks to destroy the passions instead of controlling them is trying to play the angel.
    (Voltaire [François Marie Arouet] (1694-1778), French philosopher, author. "On the Pensées of Pascal," letter 18, Letters on England (1732). Note to Pascal's aphorism no. 358 (numbered 52 by Voltaire): "Man is neither angel nor brute, and the pity of it is that he who wants to play the angel acts the brute.")
  • 32.
    It is no doubt possible to fly—but first you must know how to dance like an angel.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 10, p. 552, selection 17[46], eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Unpublished fragments dating to Fall 1883.)
  • 33.
    That ain't snow, Mike. That's angel hair. We done died and gone to heaven.
    (Charles Beaumont (1930-1967), U.S. screenwriter, and Edward Bernds. Lt. Turner (Patrick Waltz), Queen of Outer Space, looking at the landscape from their crash site (1958). From a story by Ben Hecht (1893-1964); real name Charles Nutt.)
  • 34.
    I feel ruefully sure, also, that one must be at least one sort of fool to rush in over ground so well trodden by the angels.
    (J.L. (John Langshaw) Austin (1911-1960), British philosopher. Philosophical Papers, p. 76, Oxford University Press, second edition (1970). Remark concerning discussing the problem of other minds.)
    More quotations from: J.L. (John Langshaw) Austin
  • 35.
    Angels may be very excellent sort of folk in their own way, but we, poor mortals in our present state, would probably find them precious slow company.
    (Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927), British author. "On Vanity and Vanities," Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow (1889).)
    More quotations from: Jerome K Jerome
  • 36.
    Human work must be done honourably and thoroughly, because we are now Men;Mwhether we ever expect to be angels, or were ever slugs, being practically no matter.
    (John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Fors Claveriga, letter 76 (1877).)
    More quotations from: John Ruskin, work
  • 37.
    If within the sophisticated man there is not an unsophisticated one, then he is but one of the devil's angels.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Life Without Principle" (1863), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 468, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau
  • 38.
    Ask anyone committed to Marxist analysis how many angels on the head of a pin, and you will be asked in return to never mind the angels, tell me who controls the production of pins.
    (Joan Didion (b. 1934), U.S. essayist. "The Women's Movement," The White Album (1979).)
    More quotations from: Joan Didion
  • 39.
    The question is this—Is man an ape or an angel? My Lord, I am on the side of the angels. I repudiate with indignation and abhorrence these new fangled theories.
    (Benjamin Disraeli (1804-1881), British statesman, author. Speech, November 25, 1864, Diocesan Conference, Oxford.)
    More quotations from: Benjamin Disraeli, angel
  • 40.
    In this busy modernized age, it's easy to be blind to the light all around us. You see, there truly are real angels living amongst us that look just like you and I. If you pay attention, you can spot one because they're quite easy to find. They're the souls with the eternally deep eyes that always act like something is broken inside, but fail to realize it's just their wings.
    (Suzy Kassem)
    More quotations from: Suzy Kassem
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