Quotations About / On: BABY

  • 51.
    We can see that the baby is as much an instrument of nourishment for us as we are for him.
    (Polly Berrien Berends (20th century), U.S. author. Whole Child/Whole Parent, ch. 2 (rev. 1987).)
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  • 52.
    I'm not going to call a dog 'Dog.' I suppose if she were a baby you'd call her 'Person.'
    (Warren Beatty (b. 1937), U.S. actor, director, screenwriter, and Trevor Griffiths. Louise Bryant (Diane Keaton), Reds, to John Reed (Warren Beatty) (1981).)
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  • 53.
    Babies are beautiful, wonderful, exciting, enchanting, extraordinary little creatures—who grow up into ordinary folk like us.
    (Doris Dyson. quoted in What Is a Baby?, By Richard and Helen Exley.)
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  • 54.
    There is no dream of love, however ideal it may be, which does not end up with a fat, greedy baby hanging from the breast.
    (Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Samuel Cramer, in La Fanfarlo (1847), trans. 1986.)
  • 55.
    The popularity of that baby-faced boy, who possessed not even the elements of a good actor, was a hallucination in the public mind, and a disgrace to our theatrical history.
    (Thomas Campbell (1777-1844), Scottish poet. Life of Mrs. Siddons, ch. 18 (1834). Campell referred to the child actor "Master Betty," William Henry West Betty (1791-1874), who had been taken up by the fashionable world, playing the roles of Romeo and Hamlet at the age of twelve, as well as that of Richard III. The craze lasted two years, to the despair of many, including journalist and poet Leigh Hunt. Hunt was eventually able to write in a contemporary newspaper: "The charm of novelty has at length broken ... and the town is just now somewhat in the position of the husband who, after passing the honeymoon with a beautiful but childish woman, finds his reason once more returning and is content to sit down and ask why he has been pleased.")
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  • 56.
    Even animals have a conscience. Those in the jungle KILL only to eat, not live to kill. This is why we often see packs of predators focusing on just one kill, instead of targeting many. Even animals exercise reason. I have seen a mother lion taking care of a baby antelope, and a mother elephant taking care of a baby lion. The primal need to eat is unavoidable, yet even under severe hunger stretches, the desire to love can sometimes overcome the desire to eat.
    (Suzy Kassem)
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  • 57.
    Only when human sorrows are turned into a toy with glaring colors will baby people become interested—for a while at least. The people are a very fickle baby that must have new toys every day.
    (Emma Goldman (1869-1940), U.S. anarchist. "The Traffic in Women," Anarchism and Other Essays (1910).)
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  • 58.
    All adults who care about a baby will naturally be in competition for that baby.... Each adult wishes that he or she could do each job a bit more skillfully for the infant or small child than the other.
    (T. Berry Brazelton (20th century), U.S. author, pediatrician. Touchpoints, ch. 1 (1992).)
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  • 59.
    The conscientious mother of this age approaches the birth of her first baby with two ideas firmly in mind. One is that she will raise the baby by schedule. The other, that she will not let it suck its thumb.
    (Gladys D. Schultz. originally appeared in "Must Parents Worry About Thumb- sucking?" The Parents Magazine (July 1935). As quoted in Mothering, by Elaine Heffner, ch. 11 (1978).)
  • 60.
    Media mystifications should not obfuscate a simple, perceivable fact; Black teenage girls do not create poverty by having babies. Quite the contrary, they have babies at such a young age precisely because they are poor—because they do not have the opportunity to acquire an education, because meaningful, well-paying jobs and creative forms of recreation are not accessible to them ... because safe, effective forms of contraception are not available to them.
    (Angela Davis (b. 1944), U.S. political activist. Address, November 15, 1987. "Facing Our Common Foe," published in Women, Culture and Politics (1989).)
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