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Quotations About / On: BABY

  • 61.
    Cultural expectations shade and color the images that parents- to-be form. The baby product ads, showing a woman serenely holding her child, looking blissfully and mysteriously contented, or the television parents, wisely and humorously solving problems, influence parents-to-be.
    (Ellen Galinsky (20th century), U.S. author and researcher. Between Generations, ch. 1 (1981).)
  • 62.
    The difference between writing a book and being on television is the difference between conceiving a child and having a baby made in a test tube.
    (Norman Mailer (b. 1923), U.S. author. repr. In Conversations with Norman Mailer, ed. J. Michael Lennon (1988). "The Siege of Mailer: Hero to Historian," Village Voice (New York, Jan. 21, 1971).)
  • 63.
    I don't want her to have a cat because she'll end up talking baby talk to the cat. That's the way it is, and how can a P.I. do that?
    (Sue Grafton (b. 1940), U.S. mystery novelist. As quoted in the New York Times, p. C10 (August 4, 1994). On why Kinsey Millhone, the private-investigator heroine of her popular series of mystery novels, will never have a cat.)
    More quotations from: Sue Grafton, cat, baby
  • 64.
    Well, Pa, a woman can change better than a man. A man lives, sort of, well, in jerks. A baby's born or somebody dies and that's a jerk. He gets a farm or loses it and that's a jerk. With a woman, it's all in one flow, like a stream. Little eddies and waterfalls, but the river, it goes right on. A woman looks at it that way.
    (Nunnally Johnson (1897-1977), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Ma Joad (Jane Darwell), The Grapes of Wrath, reply when Pa says she's the one who keeps the family going (1940). Based on the novel by John Steinbeck.)
  • 65.
    If you think you are emancipated, you might consider the idea of tasting your menstrual blood—if it makes you sick, you've a long way to go, baby.
    (Germaine Greer (b. 1939), Australian feminist writer. The Female Eunuch, "The Wicked Womb," (1970).)
    More quotations from: Germaine Greer, baby, sick
  • 66.
    If you think you are emancipated, you might consider the idea of tasting your menstrual blood—if it makes you sick, you've a long way to go, baby.
    (Germaine Greer (b. 1939), Australian feminist writer. The Female Eunuch, "The Wicked Womb," (1970).)
    More quotations from: Germaine Greer, baby, sick
  • 67.
    Everyone knows that by far the happiest and universally enjoyable age of man is the first. What is there about babies which makes us hug and kiss and fondle them, so that even an enemy would give them help at that age?
    (Desiderius Erasmus (c. 1466-1536), Dutch humanist. Praise of Folly, ch. 13 (1509).)
    More quotations from: Desiderius Erasmus, kiss
  • 68.
    I've always been impressed by the different paths babies take in their physical development on the way to walking. It's rare to see a behavior that starts out with such wide natural variation, yet becomes so uniform after only a few months.
    (Lawrence Kutner (20th century), U.S. child psychologist and author. Pregnancy and Your Baby's First Year, ch. 9 (1993).)
    More quotations from: Lawrence Kutner
  • 69.
    As one child psychologist friend of mine explains it with tongue in cheek, your baby only needs a lot of light at night if he's reading or he's entertaining guests.
    (Lawrence Kutner (20th century), U.S. child psychologist and author. Pregnancy and Your Baby's First Year, ch. 10 (1993).)
  • 70.
    Suddenly we have a baby who poops and cries, and we are trying to calm, clean up, and pin things together all at once. Then as fast as we learn to cope—so soon—it is hard to recall why diapers ever seemed so important. The frontiers change, and now perhaps we have a teenager we can't reach.
    (Polly Berrien Berends (20th century), U.S. author. Whole Child/Whole Parent, ch. 2 (rev. 1987).)
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