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Quotations About / On: BABY

  • 61.
    The truth is, no matter how trying they become, babies two and under don't have the ability to make moral choices, so they can't be "bad." That category only exists in the adult mind.
    (Anne Cassidy (20th century), U.S. writer. "Babies Have Bad Days Too," Working Mother (November 1988).)
    More quotations from: Anne Cassidy, truth
  • 62.
    But it is a myth to assume that the larger amount of early stimulation you provide, the more beneficial it will be. The truth is that babies can be overstimulated—which is what many parents, intent on beginning to groom their progeny for college in the cradle, end up doing.
    (Julius Segal (20th century), U.S. psychologist, author. "10 Myths About Child Development," Parents (July 1989).)
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  • 63.
    In every adult human there still lives a helpless child who is afraid of aloneness.... This would be so even if there were a possibility for perfect babies and perfect mothers.
    (Louise J. Kaplan (20th century), U.S. psychologist. Oneness and Separateness: From Infant to Individual, ch. 7 (1978).)
    More quotations from: Louise J Kaplan, perfect, child
  • 64.
    Loving a baby is a circular business, a kind of feedback loop. The more you give the more you get and the more you get the more you feel like giving.
    (Penelope Leach (20th century), U.S. child development specialist. Your Baby and Child, introduction (1983).)
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  • 65.
    If you think you are emancipated, you might consider the idea of tasting your menstrual blood—if it makes you sick, you've a long way to go, baby.
    (Germaine Greer (b. 1939), Australian feminist, writer. "The Wicked Womb," The Female Eunuch (1970).)
    More quotations from: Germaine Greer, baby, sick
  • 66.
    Cultural expectations shade and color the images that parents- to-be form. The baby product ads, showing a woman serenely holding her child, looking blissfully and mysteriously contented, or the television parents, wisely and humorously solving problems, influence parents-to-be.
    (Ellen Galinsky (20th century), U.S. author and researcher. Between Generations, ch. 1 (1981).)
  • 67.
    The difference between writing a book and being on television is the difference between conceiving a child and having a baby made in a test tube.
    (Norman Mailer (b. 1923), U.S. author. repr. In Conversations with Norman Mailer, ed. J. Michael Lennon (1988). "The Siege of Mailer: Hero to Historian," Village Voice (New York, Jan. 21, 1971).)
  • 68.
    I don't want her to have a cat because she'll end up talking baby talk to the cat. That's the way it is, and how can a P.I. do that?
    (Sue Grafton (b. 1940), U.S. mystery novelist. As quoted in the New York Times, p. C10 (August 4, 1994). On why Kinsey Millhone, the private-investigator heroine of her popular series of mystery novels, will never have a cat.)
    More quotations from: Sue Grafton, cat, baby
  • 69.
    Well, Pa, a woman can change better than a man. A man lives, sort of, well, in jerks. A baby's born or somebody dies and that's a jerk. He gets a farm or loses it and that's a jerk. With a woman, it's all in one flow, like a stream. Little eddies and waterfalls, but the river, it goes right on. A woman looks at it that way.
    (Nunnally Johnson (1897-1977), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Ma Joad (Jane Darwell), The Grapes of Wrath, reply when Pa says she's the one who keeps the family going (1940). Based on the novel by John Steinbeck.)
  • 70.
    If you think you are emancipated, you might consider the idea of tasting your menstrual blood—if it makes you sick, you've a long way to go, baby.
    (Germaine Greer (b. 1939), Australian feminist writer. The Female Eunuch, "The Wicked Womb," (1970).)
    More quotations from: Germaine Greer, baby, sick
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