Quotations About / On: BEAUTY

  • 11.
    Beauty induces attraction but love is not dependent on beauty.
    (to my students)
    More quotations from: Prof Niamat Ali Murtazai
  • 12.
    Beauty in distress is much the most affecting beauty.
    (Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. The Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, Introduction (1756).)
    More quotations from: Edmund Burke, beauty
  • 13.
    How one can notice a piece of beauty unless an ugly thing will be near by; therefore ugly is part of beauty
    (none)
    More quotations from: Nero CaroZiv
  • 14.
    Beauty is not often a thing to be searched; beauty is often a thing to be seen.
    (to my friends)
    More quotations from: Prof Niamat Ali Murtazai
  • 15.
    A new beauty has been added to the splendor of the world—the beauty of speed.
    (Tommaso Marinetti (1876-1944), Italian playwright. repr. In Marinetti: Selected Writings, ed. by R.W. Flint (1971). "Foundation and Manifesto of Futurism," Figaro (Paris, Feb. 20, 1909).)
    More quotations from: Tommaso Marinetti, beauty, world
  • 16.
    For with this desire of physical beauty mingled itself early the fear of death—the fear of death intensified by the desire of beauty.
    (Walter Pater 1839-1894, British writer, educator. originally published in Macmillan's Magazine (Aug. 1878). the narrator, in "The Child in the House," p. 163, repr. In Miscellaneous Studies, Macmillan (1895). Regarding Florian Deleal.)
    More quotations from: Walter Pater, fear, beauty, death
  • 17.
    Beauty is no quality in things themselves: It exists merely in the mind which contemplates them; and each mind perceives a different beauty.
    (David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. "Of the Standard of Taste," part I, essay XXIII, p. 229, Essays Moral, Political, and Literary, ed. Eugene F. Miller, revised edition, Indianapolis, Liberty Fund, Inc. (1987).)
    More quotations from: David Hume, beauty
  • 18.
    When the delicious beauty of lineaments loses its power, it is because a more delicious beauty has appeared; that an interior and durable form has been disclosed.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Beauty," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, beauty, power
  • 19.
    The true philosopher and the true poet are one, and a beauty, which is truth, and a truth, which is beauty, is the aim of both.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 6 (1836, revised and repr. 1849). Ever since Plato banned poetry from the Republic, statements like this have been controversial, at least in the minds of philosophers. Here, Emerson anticipates the late 20th-century work in philosophy of literature, hermeneutics, and literary theory that seeks to heal the ancient rift between philosophy and poetry.)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, beauty, truth
  • 20.
    Temperament is the primary requisite for the critic—a temperament exquisitely susceptible to beauty, and to the various impressions that beauty gives us.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891).)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, beauty
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