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Quotations About / On: BEAUTY

  • 51.
    When power becomes gracious and descends into the visible—such descent I call beauty.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 4, p. 152, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980); Thus Spoke Zarathustra, p. 118, trans. by Walter Kaufmann, New York, Penguin Books (1978). Zarathustra, in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Second Part, "On Those Who are Sublime," (1883).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, beauty, power
  • 52.
    Why is it forbidden in New York to acknowledge the charm and beauty of Los Angeles?
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Thirteenth Selection, New York (1994).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, beauty
  • 53.
    It is generally a feminine eye that first detects the moral deficiencies hidden under the "dear deceit" of beauty.
    (George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Adam Bede, bk. 1, ch. 15 (1859).)
  • 54.
    Once wealth and beauty are gone, there is always rural life.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, New York (1984).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, gone, beauty, life
  • 55.
    Art requires philosophy, just as philosophy requires art. Otherwise, what would become of beauty?
    (Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), French artist. Intimate Journals, p. 193, trans. by Van Wyck Brooks (1923, repr. 1930).)
    More quotations from: Paul Gauguin, beauty
  • 56.
    Who would not give up wit for power and beauty?
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Eighth Selection, New York (1991).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, beauty, power
  • 57.
    Children, dear and loving children, can alone console a woman for the loss of her beauty.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Mme. Gaston in a letter to Mme. De l'Estorade, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).)
  • 58.
    I have learnt to love you late, Beauty at once so ancient and so new!
    (Saint Augustine (354-430), Roman theologian, Bishop of Hippo. Confessions, bk. 10, sct. 27 (c. 397).)
    More quotations from: Saint Augustine, beauty, love
  • 59.
    If Paris lived now, and preferred beauty to power and riches, it would not be called his Judgment, but his Want of Judgment.
    (Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 60, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1787; in Greek mythology, the Judgment of Paris is the story of Paris's awarding the prize of beauty to the Goddess Aphrodite (over the Goddesses Hera and Pallas Athena) in return for the bribe of the fairest woman in the world, Helen.)
    More quotations from: Horace Walpole, paris, beauty, power
  • 60.
    Poetry, the genre of purest beauty, was born of a truncated woman: her head severed from her body with a sword, a symbolic penis.
    (Andrea Dworkin (b. 1946), U.S. feminist critic. Pornography, ch. 4 (1981).)
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