Quotations About / On: BIRTH

  • 11.
    I gave up before birth.
    (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. The narrator, in "Fizzle 4," Fizzles, p. 31, Grove Press (1976).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Beckett, birth
  • 12.
    Birth dates and bathroom scales tell more truth than I want to know.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Fourth Selection, New York (1987).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, birth, truth
  • 13.
    The dreamcrossed twilight between birth and dying.
    (T.S. (Thomas Stearns) Eliot (1888-1965), Anglo-American poet, critic. "Ash-Wednesday," pt. 6 (1930).)
  • 14.
    Birth was the death of him.
    (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. Speaker, in "A Piece of Monologue," one of the dramatic pieces in The Collected Shorter Plays of Samuel Beckett, p. 265, Grove Press (1984).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Beckett, birth, death
  • 15.
    Beauty is the still birth of suffering, every woman knows that.
    (Emily Prager (b. 1948), U.S. journalist, author. Lao Bing, in "A Visit from the Footbinder," Close Company: Stories of Mothers and Daughters, eds. Christine Park and Caroline Heaton (1987).)
    More quotations from: Emily Prager, birth, beauty, woman
  • 16.
    There should be weeping at a man's birth, not at his death.
    (Charles Louis de Secondat Montesquieu (1689-1755), French philosopher, lawyer. Persian Letters, no. 40 (1721), trans. by C.J. Betts (1973).)
  • 17.
    Never lend your car to anyone to whom you have given birth.
    (Erma Bombeck (20th century), U.S. humorist and author. As quoted in Woman to Woman, by Julia Gilden and Mark Riedman (1994).)
    More quotations from: Erma Bombeck, car, birth
  • 18.
    Youth is not a question of years: one is young or old from birth.
    (Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972), U.S.-born French author. quoted in "Samples from Almost Illegible Notebooks," no. 299, Adam (1962).)
    More quotations from: Natalie Clifford Barney, birth
  • 19.
    The main facts in human life are five: birth, food, sleep, love and death.
    (E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. Aspects of the Novel, ch. 3 (1927).)
  • 20.
    Birth means nothing where there is no virtue.
    (Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French comic playwright. Dom Juan's father, in Dom Juan, act 4, sc. 4 (1665).)
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