Quotations About / On: BIRTH

  • 21.
    The main facts in human life are five: birth, food, sleep, love and death.
    (E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. Aspects of the Novel, ch. 3 (1927).)
  • 22.
    Birth means nothing where there is no virtue.
    (Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French comic playwright. Dom Juan's father, in Dom Juan, act 4, sc. 4 (1665).)
  • 23.
    Our birth is nothing but our death begun.
    (Edward Young (1683-1765), British poet, playwright. repr. In Complete Works, ed. J. Doran (1968). Night 5, l. 718, The Complaint, or Night-Thoughts on Life, Death and Immortality (1742-1746).)
    More quotations from: Edward Young, birth, death
  • 24.
    Hope is like a harebell trembling from its birth.
    (Christina Georgina Rossetti (1830-1894), British poet, lyricist. Hope Is Like a Harebell. Harebell = bluebell.)
  • 25.
    There is no cure for birth and death save to enjoy the interval.
    (George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "War Shrines," Soliloquies in England (1922).)
    More quotations from: George Santayana, birth, death
  • 26.
    Gratitude to gratitude always gives birth.
    (Sophocles (497-406/5 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Ajax, l. 522.)
    More quotations from: Sophocles, birth
  • 27.
    When we have flowers, thank the rain. When we have rain, thank the groung that gives birth to the finished product.
    (By Luis A. Estable)
    More quotations from: Luis Estable
  • 28.
    The rhythm of the weekend, with its birth, its planned gaieties, and its announced end, followed the rhythm of life and was a substitute for it.
    (F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. "Notebook D," The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945).)
    More quotations from: F. Scott Fitzgerald, birth, life
  • 29.
    ... it is nearly impossible to understand those who are beyond our sight, who are not explained to us by ties of birth or the contact of the flesh.
    (Rebecca West (1892-1983), British author. The Strange Necessity, ch. 10 (1928).)
    More quotations from: Rebecca West, birth
  • 30.
    He had not the least pride of birth and rank, that common narrow notion of little minds, that wretched mistaken succedaneum of merit.
    (Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Characters of Chesterfield, 1778, repr. Augustan Reprint Society, nos. 259-260, p. 43, University of California, Los Angeles (1990). Character of Lord Scarborough, one of Chesterfield's closest friends.)
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