Quotations About / On: BIRTH

  • 21.
    Birth means nothing where there is no virtue.
    (Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French comic playwright. Dom Juan's father, in Dom Juan, act 4, sc. 4 (1665).)
  • 22.
    Our birth is nothing but our death begun.
    (Edward Young (1683-1765), British poet, playwright. repr. In Complete Works, ed. J. Doran (1968). Night 5, l. 718, The Complaint, or Night-Thoughts on Life, Death and Immortality (1742-1746).)
    More quotations from: Edward Young, birth, death
  • 23.
    Hope is like a harebell trembling from its birth.
    (Christina Georgina Rossetti (1830-1894), British poet, lyricist. Hope Is Like a Harebell. Harebell = bluebell.)
  • 24.
    There is no cure for birth and death save to enjoy the interval.
    (George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. "War Shrines," Soliloquies in England (1922).)
    More quotations from: George Santayana, birth, death
  • 25.
    Gratitude to gratitude always gives birth.
    (Sophocles (497-406/5 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Ajax, l. 522.)
    More quotations from: Sophocles, birth
  • 26.
    When we have flowers, thank the rain. When we have rain, thank the groung that gives birth to the finished product.
    (By Luis A. Estable)
    More quotations from: Luis Estable
  • 27.
    The rhythm of the weekend, with its birth, its planned gaieties, and its announced end, followed the rhythm of life and was a substitute for it.
    (F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. "Notebook D," The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945).)
    More quotations from: F. Scott Fitzgerald, birth, life
  • 28.
    ... it is nearly impossible to understand those who are beyond our sight, who are not explained to us by ties of birth or the contact of the flesh.
    (Rebecca West (1892-1983), British author. The Strange Necessity, ch. 10 (1928).)
    More quotations from: Rebecca West, birth
  • 29.
    He had not the least pride of birth and rank, that common narrow notion of little minds, that wretched mistaken succedaneum of merit.
    (Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. Characters of Chesterfield, 1778, repr. Augustan Reprint Society, nos. 259-260, p. 43, University of California, Los Angeles (1990). Character of Lord Scarborough, one of Chesterfield's closest friends.)
  • 30.
    Irishness is not primarily a question of birth or blood or language; it is the condition of being involved in the Irish situation, and usually of being mauled by it.
    (Conor Cruise O'Brien (b. 1917), Irish historian, critic, diplomat. "Irishness," New Statesman (London, Jan. 1959).)
    More quotations from: Conor Cruise O'Brien, birth
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